Navigation

Mastering Masterclass #2

01-07-2016
Mastering Masterclass #2
In a new video series #findyoursound our top mastering engineers share tips and hints helping you with the last stages of music production.

In the second installment of three episodes in our #findyoursound series, mastering engineer Christian Wright – whose previous mastering credits include Ed Sheeran, Blur, Ariel Pink and Lily Allen – gives us an education on sibilance and excessive limiting.

Got any questions for our mastering team? Submit them to us here and the best will be responded to in future episodes.

 



Share with your friends on:
Sign up for All About Abbey Road news

Abbey Road Red RedTalks 3D Audio

22-06-2016
Abbey Road Red RedTalks 3D Audio
Watch footage from the April edition of Abbey Road Red's RedTalks, when 50 leaders in the field of immersive audio met in Studio Three to hear new music technology companies including OSSIC and Marshmallow Laser Feast discuss 3D Audio.

Watch it now on YouTube.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road And Technics Join Forces

15-06-2016
Abbey Road And Technics Join Forces
Abbey Road Studios and Technics are proud to announce that they have joined forces for the launch of the brand new Grand Class turntable range – the SL-1200GAE and SL-1200G.
 
Their release marks the 50th anniversary of Technics turntables and the new SL-1200s - which are now in residency at the Studios - have been developed for audiophiles looking to rediscover and experience the unique sound quality of vinyl. They will be released this summer, with the SL-1200GAE available only in a limited run of 1200 units.
 
The Studios will host the highly anticipated redesigned versions of the Technics SL-1200 turntables in the mastering studios and restaurant, for use by artists, engineers and visitors alike. 
 
Senior mastering engineer Geoff Pesche, who has owned a pair of the original Technics 1210s for 30 years, had this to say, “I recently had a demo of the new Technics SL1200GAE in Mastering Room 5. Beautifully crafted, with a heavy platter I’ve not seen before in a domestic turntable, it tracked everything seamlessly. This is a benchmark turntable for the 21st Century.”
Share with your friends on:

Making Sense of Mastering

09-06-2016
Making Sense of Mastering
Ever wanted to pick the brains of our audio engineers?
 
In a new video series #findyoursound our top mastering engineers share tips and hints helping you with the last stages of music production.

In the first three videos below senior mastering engineer Geoff Pesche - whose past mastering credits include Coldplay, Aphex Twin, Kylie Minogue and Dizzee Rascal – takes us through questions relating to track submission, ISRC codes and DDPi masters.
 
Got any questions for our mastering team? Submit them to us here and the best will be responded to in future episodes.

 



Share with your friends on:

Less Than A Month Left To Apply For Abbey Road Red’s Music Tech Incubator

17-05-2016
Less Than A Month Left To Apply For Abbey Road Red’s Music Tech Incubator
Pictured above current incubator sign ups at Abbey Road Studios

This is a heads up for all budding music technology start-up companies – there is now less than a month left to apply for the September 2016 intake of Abbey Road Red’s music technology incubator program!
 
The incubator program lasts 6 months and gives your company a chance to benefit from Abbey Road’s extensive musical expertise, network of personnel contacts and global reach. If you run or work for the “next big thing” in music tech innovation then we would love to hear from you, so please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us asap.
 
Here’s a quick update on the current intake - 3D headphone company OSSIC have raised a staggering $2.7 million on Kickstarter (check out a video from their recent visit to the Studios here), advanced guitar learning app Uberchord are continuing to assert themselves as one of the most loved music apps on the Apple App Store and intelligent audio processing service CloudBounce are up and running with their slick, innovative (and automated) home mastering service.
 
Fancy getting involved?
 
For more information head to abbeyroad.com/abbeyroadred. To apply for the program, click here

Applications close Friday 17th June.
Share with your friends on:

Geoff Pesche: Plugins vs Hardware

12-05-2016
Geoff Pesche: Plugins vs Hardware
With so many advancements taking place in digital plugin technology, senior mastering engineer Geoff Pesche makes a case for the good quality ways of old, explaining why it is that – when it comes to pitching “in the box” digital versions of kit up against the real deal - hardware is still winning for top quality mastering.
 
The most important question that you need to ask yourself when you’re mastering a track is always, does this sound nice? Is what I’m doing to this unmastered track actually making it sound better? If the answer is yes, then you’re probably doing the job right.
 
With so many plugins now out there, promising to give you as near as possible to an exact replica of any compressor, amp or effect unit that you might like to get your hands on from just about any era throughout the whole of recording history – at a snippet of the price of the original, that fits neatly into your macbook or laptop setup - it’s easy to see why you might be tricked into seeing traditional hardware as the clunky, expensive and out-of-date alternative.
 
But that still just isn’t the case.
 
As someone who started mastering tracks back in the 1980s, in a time long before plugins arrived on the scene, I have been able to hear the digital revolution come along first hand. And to my ears still to this day, after trying my hand at just about every emerging digital alternative along the way, you still can’t beat the real thing when it comes to mastering a track. At least, when you have access to the sort of custom made and vintage kit that we do here at Abbey Road.
 
Due to its history as a testing ground for all of the new EMI recording equipment in the 1960s and 1970s, Abbey Road’s engineers can get their hands on a load of great custom made gear exclusive to the Studio that’s dated incredibly well. In fact, things like the TG mixing desks that are the centre piece of every mastering room at the Studios, are still widely regarded as producing the best sound in their field to this day. Because this kit was so well built at the time, as opposed to mass produced for the market, it’s aged incredibly well and still remains some of the best out there for what we need it to do!
 
A clear signal path is essential for a good mastering job, and there’s a transparency to hardware that makes it perfect for the sort of subtle tweaks and changes needed to get a good master of a track. It keeps things simple, so you can focus on the sound. And when it comes to mastering, that’s the most important bit! There’s a warmth and a width to it that you can really feel. It’s a really clean way of processing your sound.
 
Things are different with digital by its very nature. You’re dealing with loudness and brightness, trying to replicate great analogue sounds as best possible. It’s a very different and complicated process, although an increasingly more powerful one, and one that’s getting better and better at doing the job of the old guard all the time.
 
So who knows, ten years from now I might be painting a very different picture about the relative merits of hardware compared to plugins and other digital mastering technologies. But as someone in my line of work who’s had to learn to trust their ears as a matter of profession, the best in vintage hardware is still the best that’s out there when it comes to mastering your tracks.
 
At least for now!
Share with your friends on:

James Blake "f.o.r.e.v.e.r."

10-05-2016
James Blake "f.o.r.e.v.e.r."
The much anticipated third studio album from James Blake The Colour In Anything is out now, clocking in at 17 tracks in total with additional production work from Rick Rubin.

Track 5 the emotional "f.o.r.e.v.e.r." was recorded here at Abbey Road in Studio Three back in November 2014, with recording handled by engineers Matt Mysko and Paul Pritchard.

Listen to the album in full now on Spotify. 

 
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road and Google win at Music Week Awards

29-04-2016
Abbey Road and Google win at Music Week Awards
Pictured above Abbey Road's Mirek Stiles (Head of Audio Products), Rachel Haller (Senior Partnership Manager) and Giles Martin who did the narration for Inside Abbey Road.

Over the moon to have been presented with the award for best Music & Brand Partnership at last night's Music Week Awards for our Inside Abbey Road project with Google!

The platform allows anyone in the world to take a look inside the Studios for the first time ever, either in your browser or in virtual reality using your smart phone and Google Cardboard.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road meets: Wade Goeke, Chandler Limited

12-04-2016
Abbey Road meets: Wade Goeke, Chandler Limited
Following the recent release of the classic TG Microphone Cassette from Chandler Limited and Abbey Road, we took some time to sit down to talk music, recording, hereoes and electronics with Owner and Chief Product Designer at Chandler, Wade Goeke.

What was your first job in the music industry?
 
One of my first jobs in Los Angeles was working for an automated concert lighting company called Vari-Lite. I worked my way up to shop technician and spent my days testing, repairing, and calibrating the lights.  I learned a lot about trouble shooting and repairing on a sub assembly level and it was quite a valuable experience. The large Pink Floyd circle of lights was one of our systems. Eventually I wanted to move more into the audio world and took a job selling electronic parts at a company called Yale Electronics in Hollywood. My boss there was a former Neve mechanical engineer and manager and he was a big influence. He encouraged my love of old gear and introduced me to studio owners around town as they would come in. At the time I already owned a pretty nice studio rig including a 24-track tape machine and since I could calibrate machines, wire patch bays and recap the occasional console module, moving into studio work was a natural progression. I started working at several studios in Hollywood, the first was Hollywood Sound. There I worked on a number of projects including a Slayer record assisting for Rick Rubin. After a time I moved down the street to Grandmaster Recorders and worked with producer Gil Norton (Foo Fighters, Counting Crows). Assisting in the studio, to me, was always about being available but not being in the way.  Once the sessions were up and running, I would set up a solder station off in the corner and build my electronic projects, and plan and learn, but be near and ready to help. I think the producers would get a kick out of the kid in the corner building his own Neve console modules. From there I took a job running the shop of a known refurbisher of vintage electronics. I did all the repairs, calibration, testing and dealing with customers and got to know vintage Neve, API, Quad Eight and Calrec console modules and entire consoles quite well. I even helped refurbish a vintage API console and got to install it in Don Henley’s personal studio in his Malibu beach house. Quite an experience. It was while working there that I decided I wanted to start my own company.
 
When did you first start experimenting with electronic engineering?
 
In 8th grade I told my parents I “have to have a 4-track recorder or my life will be over. . . .”  Luckily they wanted to me to live and they got me a little Tascam cassette 4-track for Christmas. Not a small item for 1982. It took me awhile to figure out how to use it correctly.  For a decent amount of time I would do a tape reduction every time I recorded something new.  I didn’t know the difference of course at the age of 12. That was really when my love of gadgets and love of music met head on and set me on a path.

How did you learn the ropes in electronic engineering and really hone in on your skills?
 
I really started getting serious about electronics right after high school. I had moved to Los Angeles from my little town of Waverly, Iowa to pursue music. I started realizing pretty quickly that I liked the studio and electronics more than being a performer and so changed in that direction instead. My first significant project was building Neve 1066 and 1073 console modules from scavenged spare parts. I built 2 or 3 modules to start and then came back and built 4 more. I also worked at remaking the TG12413 Limiter which I had talked my folks into helping me purchase. Later I purchased a Neve console frame that had been emptied of all its modules and set about rebuilding all the modules. Really my education just came from tearing into all the old stuff and refusing to give up until I understood it. Also, I purchased and studied numerous electronics textbooks.  My biggest blessing and my biggest curse is that I won’t give up on something once I’ve made up my mind. My focus from a design and engineering standpoint has been to let the sound I want to capture create the circuit. That required many years and many hours of self-education and experimentation.
 
How did Chandler Limited come together?
 
When I was in the beginning stages of redesigning vintage equipment, I lived in North Hollywood and had a regular day job. I worked most of the night out of a small walk-in closet workshop.  After a while, I wanted to have a “company name” to show I had a business.  My dad suggested combining my middle name “Chandler” with “Limited” and the name “Chandler Limited” was born.  In the late 90's I decided to quit my day job so I could focus on designing and selling music gear full time. A few years later I realized I could not afford to build my business in California, so I moved back to my home town of Waverly, Iowa.
 
Who were your mentors, who encouraged you to take the path you did?
 
My parents have probably been the biggest influence on my life from a non-electronics point of view. They helped me get equipment I needed to get started and supported my decisions even when they thought I might be nuts. Deep down I think they understood I had a direction and I just needed some time and support to get there.  My parents are still intricate in Chandler Limited’s business. My mother, Judy, handles the business aspects of the company and my father, Dale, handles all of our legal business including contract negotiations with Abbey Road.

Who are your heroes?
 
EMI’s Mike Batchelor is a huge one. Obviously there were many engineers who made significant contributions in the technical history of EMI. Vanderlyn, Livy, Page, and others, but Mike Batchelor always seemed to be present and influential.  Len Page’s notes on development of the RS124 mention recommendations from “Mr. Batchelor.”  To me, he is one of the most significant figures in audio history. I was not fortunate enough to meet Mr. Batchelor but thanks to Lester Smith I was able to write a note to his son and thank him for his late father’s amazing contributions. He assured me his father would be amazed to know that people still appreciate the old stuff after all these years.
 
How did you first hear about the Abbey Road equipment – TG, RS and REDD?
 
Early in my quest, I purchased an original TG12413 Limiter which had come from one of the EMI studios. That more than wet my appetite for Abbey Road gear.
 
Abbey Road are obviously fans of what you do, but how did the relationship start?
 
I grew up listening to my parents playing Beatles’ songs and other 60s music.  As I focused on recording gear, it was natural for me to be curious about the gear designed by EMI engineers and used at Abbey Road Studios.  The more I studied my vintage gear, the more I thought other people would desire access to recreations of that hardware.  When I redesigned the TG12413 Limiter and started selling it, EMI learned of my efforts.  They evaluated the quality and sound of my work and were happy with what they found.  We then worked out an agreement where I continued to design recreations of EMI vintage studio hardware.
 
What was it like for you the first time you visited Abbey Road Studios?
 
It was a bit scary for a young guy from the American Midwest to show up and say how he was going to reintroduce the world to EMI equipment. I’m sure the guys were, rightfully so, quite skeptical. I can still feel their eyes on me! I’ll always remember how welcoming Lester Smith, Richard Hale, Simon Campbell, Mirek Stiles and a number of the veterans were. There were a few nights in the famous Abbey Road Cantina hearing stories about the old days that a wide-eyed Iowa boy will never forget. On one of my first visits when I sat down to lunch in the same Cantina, I looked up and at the table across from me were George Martin, Neil Aspinall, and Giles Martin. We don’t get that kind of lunch back home in Iowa! I noticed Neil first from some of the Beatles documentaries, then I noticed Giles and then George!
 
Some of the Abbey Road engineers have come to Iowa to visit our workshop. Pete Cobbin visited early on in our relationship. Pete made a big impression on my son because he went back to his 3rd grade class and told his teacher “My friend Pete Cobbin is visiting. He records the Beatles.”  As the commercials say, Priceless!

You have had access to the historic EMI archives. What is the most impressive or surprising schematic or historic document you have seen?
 
I guess I would say it’s more of a general view of seeing how Mike Batchelor worked. Seeing how he worked and notated was obviously educational, but what I noticed was that it all seemed very natural for him. He seemed to view the wider picture quite easily and was also a brilliant mathematician. Both Mike Batchelor and EMI as a whole seemed to be ahead of their time.
 
An example is the first TG mixing console. When installed in Studio 2 for the Beatles’ “Abbey Road” sessions in 1969 it had, what would now be called, a fully featured channel strip with pre amp, equalizer, and compressor/limiter on every channel! This is something that Solid State Logic is given a lot of credit for, but EMI had done it a full decade before them. It also featured advanced imaging circuits derived from the even earlier REDD desks and excellent routing and control features. By contrast, Rupert Neve desks of the time were still in their earlier stages and had basic three-band EQ and relatively simple facilities when compared to a TG desk.
 
Another example would be the RS56 Universal Tone Control.  This is the earliest example of a multi-band equalizer with selectable Q’s and equalization curves that I know of.  It was also done long before active solid state electronics allowed for complex equalization circuits to be more simply made. At the time most EQ’s were simple high and low shelving tone controls. The RS56 had three fully selectable bands that not only had multiple EQ points per band but also had 5 different Q selections per band, allowing the engineers a degree of control that I believe no other place in the world had. To me this unit is where nearly all modern equalizers are derived from and it was issued a full 20 years before the competition.
 
How has the industry changed since you started out?
 
When first starting, I felt that there was much more interest in quality than there is today. We have always handmade all of our products because I feel that’s how the greatest products in the history of audio were made. Today’s trends are to make things as cheaply as possible and to shortcut all the manufacturing processes that make audio circuits great. Many companies today use technology that was developed to manufacture computers and cell phones to save time and money. Surface-mount components that are ultra-miniature and can be assembled by machines are common place as well as completely replacing internal wiring with cheap unshielded ribbon cables. As an example, one of our non-Abbey Road products was copied in China in cooperation with an American company. After copying it, they offered to sell us our own product!  I have no words for that.

Also at that time, there was not much of the current vintage craze happening. People were just starting to rebound from the 80s trend of throwing out or giving away old gear. I was fortunate to come in at a time when there were few players in the game other than Neve and API, and both of them were focused purely on modern style consoles. Neve did not want to be asked about 1073's. Now it is hard to sell a product that is not pure vintage in style or even a plain copy of an old piece.  Things have come full circle.
 
Do you think there will always be an interest in analogue hardware?
 
To a certain extent there will have to be until USB jacks are installed in every vocalist. I don’t think the physics of the universe can be completely replicated in a computer. A sound wave vibrating a micro-thin gold diaphragm that translates the sound into an audio signal . . . then replicated with ones and zeros? I’m not sure that can ever completely happen.
 
What is your favorite piece of analogue hardware you have used?
 
On one of my early visits to Abbey Road to present my first working Curve Bender, Pete Cobbin said “The REDD.47 is my favorite pre amp ever”.  He was right!
 
If you could get your hands on any piece of legendary hardware from recording history, what would it be and why?
 
It would definitely be an RS61 Amplifier from the old days. So few of those were made and the stories from Abbey Road engineers place it among the most used of the classic gear as well as being the pinnacle of sound.
 
What advice would you give someone interested in electronics for music production?
 
Patience and perseverance. After all, we are controlling electrons passing through a vacuum.  That’s NASA stuff!
 
In your professional life, what has been your proudest moment?
 
Signing our second contract with Abbey Road is the top for sure. Giles Martin introducing me to Sir George Martin and Lady Martin at the Abbey Road 75th Anniversary party is something I will never forget!  Giles said, “Dad this is the guy who built some of the stuff we used on Love.”
 
In your opinion, what is the greatest sounding recording ever made?
 
"Tomorrow Never Knows” - no question about it.  But I love the sounds of the 60s and 70s in general. Everything had a special quality to it. 

The Chandler Limited TG Microphone Cassette is a full-featured mixing console channel strip, incorporating elements of the historic EMI / Abbey Road Studios TG12345, and is available from worldwide dealers right now. Check it out here.
Share with your friends on:

Inside Abbey Road nominated for a Webby Award

12-04-2016
Inside Abbey Road nominated for a Webby Award
Abbey Road Studios has been nominated for a prize at this year's Webby Awards!

The prize is in the 'Mobile Sites & Apps / Music' category and is for the Inside Abbey Road project with Google, which recently launched the Studios into the realms of virtual reality for the first time ion history.

In case you weren't aware, The Webby Awards is the leading international award ceremony honoring excellence on the Internet, and past winners include Amazon.com, eBay, Facebook, NASA and Justin Bieber.

Help us win by voting here.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road and Chandler Limited Release TG Microphone Cassette

07-04-2016
Abbey Road and Chandler Limited Release TG Microphone Cassette
Pictured above Bill Livy – Abbey Road Technical Dept. Chief Engineer with a TG Cassette.

The Chandler Limited TG Microphone Cassette is a full-featured mixing console channel strip, incorporating elements of the historic EMI/Abbey Road Studios TG12345 recording console, including preamp, EQ and compressor/limiter.
 
Conceived from meetings in 1967 between Abbey Road engineers and EMI’s Central Research Laboratories technical team, the EMI TG12345 desk (later known as Mark I) would usher in a sea change in sound and flexibility at Abbey Road Studios.
 
The desk encountered many revisions throughout the ‘70s and became the main recording console used throughout the studios until 1983. The EMI TG12345 console Marks I–IV were used on everything from Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here to John Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band, George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass to epic film scores including Raiders of the Lost Ark.
 
To learn more about the TG Microphone Cassette, click here.
Share with your friends on:

Take A Virtual Step Into Abbey Road Studios with Google Cardboard

31-03-2016
Take A Virtual Step Into Abbey Road Studios with Google Cardboard
For the first time ever, take a virtual step into Abbey Road Studios!

Abbey Road have teamed up with Google once again to take last year's Inside Abbey Road experience on to Google Cardboard, officially taking the Studios into the world of virtual reality.

To start your virtual reality tour of the world's most famous Studios all that you need is Google Cardboard and your smartphone. Simply download the app on Android (iOS coming soon) and you'll instantly be taken on a nine-part tour of the Studios led by Giles Martin, the son of the late Beatles producer Sir George Martin.

Following this you can click your way through the Studios at your own leisure, seeing and hearing up close and personal for the first time everything from Studio Three's Mirrored Drum Room and Abbey Road's Mastering Suites to a recording session in Studio One with the London Symphony Orchestra in full surround sound.

Download the app now from Google Play.
Share with your friends on:

Sir George Martin (3rd January 1926 – 8th March 2016)

09-03-2016
Sir George Martin (3rd January 1926 – 8th March 2016)
Abbey Road Studios wish to express their deepest condolences to the Martin family on hearing the sad news that Sir George passed away yesterday, aged 90. Sir George transformed music recording with his creative flair, innovation and passion and we want to express our deep sadness at losing such an immensely talented, charming and warm man. We are committed to ensuring Sir George's visionary legacy lives forever at Abbey Road Studios, and we are hugely honoured to be part of his story.

Sir George Martin (3rd January 1926 – 8th March 2016)
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Red Announces Music Tech Incubation Intake

08-03-2016
Abbey Road Red Announces Music Tech Incubation Intake
After receiving a staggering number of applications from companies across the globe followed by thorough assessment and a pitch day in Studio Three in February, we are happy to announce that we have now selected the three companies who will be joining Abbey Road Red's music tech incubation program for the next 6 months: OSSICUberchord and CloudBounce.

Each company is working on an impressive emerging technology for music, and all three address a very different market. OSSIC, from California, are developing advanced headphones as well as accompanying software for natural 3D spatial audio playback, Uberchord, from Berlin, are developing a series of unique chordal recognition technologies plus adaptive teaching methodologies to help people when learning a new instrument, and CloudBounce, from Finland, are combining machine listening with machine learning and autonomous processing to create intelligent audio systems for mastering.

Exciting times. You can head over to each of their websites for more info: OSSIC (kickstarter), UberchordCloudbounce.
We are really looking forward to working with each of these three companies over the next 6 months as we help them to refine their products and build their businesses in these all important early stages of their growth.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Red - Spring 2016 Incubator Intake

08-03-2016
Abbey Road Red - Spring 2016 Incubator Intake
After receiving a staggering number of applications from companies across the globe followed by thorough assessment and a pitch day in Studio Three in February, we are happy to announce that we have now selected the three companies who will be joining Abbey Road Red's music tech incubation program for the next 6 months: OSSICUberchord and CloudBounce.

Each company is working on an impressive emerging technology for music, and all three address a very different market. OSSIC, from California, are developing advanced headphones as well as accompanying software for natural 3D spatial audio playback, Uberchord, from Berlin, are developing a series of unique chordal recognition technologies plus adaptive teaching methodologies to help people when learning a new instrument, and CloudBounce, from Finland, are combining machine listening with machine learning and autonomous processing to create intelligent audio systems for mastering.

Exciting times. You can head over to each of their websites for more info: OSSIC (kickstarter), UberchordCloudbounce.

We are really looking forward to working with each of these three companies over the next 6 months as we help them to refine their products and build their businesses in these all important early stages of their growth.
Share with your friends on:

Online Mastering Competition - Winners Announced!

08-03-2016
Online Mastering Competition - Winners Announced!
To celebrate the relaunch of Abbey Road Studio's online mastering service we decided to throw our virtual mastering room doors open to the public offering you the chance to have your own tracks mastered at the Studios for free. 

Tracks were submitted online via Mix Magazine and Electronic Musician Magazine and it was the task of renowned mastering engineers Geoff Pesche, Chrsitian Wright and Alex Wharton to pick three winners for each publication to have their work mastered for free. 

The competition is now closed, and the winners are listed below.

Mix Magazine

1ST PRIZE: “Ellis Tucker – MLP Intentions” 3 Track EP mastered FREE + 1 Abbey Road Studios Waves plugin 
2ND PRIZE: “Craig Caudill – Time To Go” 1 track mastered FREE + Abbey Road Studios Waves plugin 
3RD PRIZE: “Lorant Toth - Moments” 1 track mastered FREE 

Electronic Musician Magazine

1ST PRIZE: “Nigel – Hoverfly” 3 Track EP mastered FREE + 1 Abbey Road Studios Waves plugin 
2ND PRIZE: “Charles Washington - Coogi” 1 track mastered FREE + Abbey Road Studios Waves plugin 
3RD PRIZE: “Scott Travis - Monsters” 1 track mastered FREE 

Congratulations to all of our winners! For more information on Abbey Road’s online mastering service as well as how to submit your own tracks for mastering click here
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road at The Oscars

29-02-2016
Abbey Road at The Oscars
Great to see so many projects close to the Studios winning at The Oscars last night.

Maestro Ennio Morricone won Best Original Score for his work on The Hateful Eight, pictured above for it in Studio One when he visited the Studios with director Quention Tarantino last year.

Spotlight won Best Picture and had its Howard Shore written score recorded and mixed by Abbey Road recording engineer Sam Okell.

Sam Smith won Best Original Song for the Spectre theme which had all of its strings and orchestration recorded here in Studio One.

Elsewhere, the moving Amy won Best Documentary and includes footage of Amy Winehouse recording her last ever track at the Studios, something that we were very honored to be able to share with her fans in the film.

Congratulations to all!
 
Share with your friends on:

Half-Speed Remastering the classics

26-02-2016
Abbey Road engineer Miles Showell, a world expert on the art of half-speed mastering, recently gave six classic albums from The Rolling Stones to Simple Minds this very special 16 2/3 rpm treatment.

We sat down with Miles to try and find out what the sonic advantages were of this backbreaking mastering process.


What is ‘Half-Speed Mastering’?

Miles: This is an elaborate process whereby the source is played back at half it’s normal speed and the turntable on the disc cutting lathe is running at 16 2/3 R.P.M. Because both the source and the cut were running at half their “normal” speeds everything plays back at the right speed when the record is played at home.

What are the advantages of Half-Speed Mastering?

M: The vinyl L.P. is an analogue sound carrier. Therefore the size and shape of the groove carrying the music is directly related to whatever the music is doing at any particular point. By reducing the speed by a factor of two the recording stylus has twice as long to carve the intricate groove into the master lacquer. Also, any difficult to cut high-frequency information becomes fairly easy to cut mid-range. The result is a record that is capable of extremely clean and un-forced high-frequency response as well as a detailed and solid stereo image.

Are there any disadvantages?

M: Only two, having to listen to music at half-speed for hour after hour can be a little difficult at least until I get to hear back the resulting cut when it all becomes worthwhile. The other dis-advantage is an inability to do any de-essing. De-essing is a form of processing the signal whereby the “sss” and “t” sounds from the vocalist are controlled in order to avoid sibilance and distortion on playback. None of the tools I would ordinarily employ on a real-time cut work at half speed as the frequencies are wrong so the offending “sss” does not trigger the limiter and everything is moving so slowly there is no acceleration as such for the de-esser to look out for. This has always been the Achilles heel of half-speed cutting until now (see below).

What was the source for this record?

M: Digital transfers made from the original ¼” MONO masters (with edits) from Atlantic Studios NYC, 1967 - transfers were made at Sterling Sound, NYC, in 2013 This album was cut from a high-resolution digital transfer from the best known analogue tape in existence. Only minimal sympathetic equalisation was applied to the transfer to keep everything as pure as possible. Also, as this was an analogue, vinyl only high quality release, I did not apply any digital limiting. This is added to almost all digital releases to make them appear to be loud and is responsible for “the loudness war” and in almost every case is anything but natural and pure sounding.

Why could it not be cut ‘all analogue’?

M: The biggest variable when cutting from tape is the replay machine. Every individual roller in the tape’s path will have a direct effect on the quality of the audio emanating from the machine. In addition to this, there is the issue of the sub 30Hz low-frequency roll off on an advance head disc-cutting tape machine which in effect will come into play at 60 Hz when running at half speed. In addition to this, there are also some unpredictable frequency anomalies in the 35-38 Hz region with analogue tape that will double up at half speed. These are all problems if you want to hear as originally intended the lowest register of the bass end on a recording. There is also the lesser potential problem of tape weave that effectively increases at lower speeds and leads to less high frequency stability and the possibility of minor azimuth errors. Even if these problems could be overcome, the source tapes for this album are held in an archive in America. The days of shipping precious analogue masters over the Atlantic are long gone. Even if Universal were to break their internal no overseas shipping rule, it would be close to impossible to get insurance cover for the tapes. Also analogue tape becomes degraded with each pass over the replay heads. These tapes are getting old and it is no longer considered good practise to play and play and play precious old original masters for fear of wearing them out. I can completely understand the reasons for the concerns that some people have when cutting classic albums from digital sources. Historically, there have been some horrible digital transfers used as a vinyl cutting source. This has absolutely not been the case with this series. Micro-management of the audio and attention to detail has been the order of the day.

Are there any advantages to this working method?

M: Yes, any problems with the tape can be treated far more accurately digitally than they could be by using traditional analogue techniques. For example de-essing. I can, by clever editing, target just the offending “sss” and leave intact the rest of the audio. Therefore high-hats, bright guitars and snare drums are not affected or reduced in impact. Using an analogue scatter-gun de-esser approach would also trigger the limiter in many parts of the audio that do not need to be worked on. The de-esser cannot tell a bright guitar from bright vocal and will smooth everything out leading to dull guitars or soft snare drums and weak hi-hats. Targeting the “sss” sounds in the vocal as I have done in this series is time consuming but is worthwhile in the pursuit of the very best possible sounding record. Also if there was any damage to the analogue tape (drop-outs and clicks for example) this can by and large be restored using modern digital methods in a way that is unobtrusive and this would be impossible using analogue methods. For the record, none of the albums in this series have been de-noised. Only clicks and drop-outs have been repaired.

All six albums are released on 15th April and will be available to buy on the Abbey Road shop. Pre-order now and be one of the first ever to hear these classic recordings sounding better than ever before!
Share with your friends on:

Colette Barber Retires

26-02-2016
Colette Barber Retires
Today marks the end of an era at Abbey Road Studios as Colette Barber steps down as Studio Manager after 36 years.

Earlier this week Colette was presented with a golden BRIT award for a lifetime’s contribution to the music industry, one of the very few awards in existence and a great testament to all of her hard work in running the Studios.

Fiona Gillott now inherits the infamous Studio bookings book and pencil, as she takes over as the new Studio Manager at Abbey Road Studios.
 
Share with your friends on:

Mark Ronson and fans cover Uptown Funk at Abbey Road

25-02-2016
Recorded here in Abbey Road's Studio Three, watch Mark Ronson get behind the mixing desk for a cover of 'Uptown Funk' performed by some unsuspecting YouTubers.
Share with your friends on:

Remembering Allan Rouse

22-02-2016
Remembering Allan Rouse
Incredibly sad to hear of the passing away of Allan Rouse, an engineer at the Studios for many years as well as friend to many of us still working here.

We hold so many fond memories of Allan, he was a huge part of Abbey Road Studios - a man who truly cared, a lover of music, and a comedy genius who could make people laugh and smile at every word.

He will be sorely missed.
 
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road win at GRAMMYs

16-02-2016
Abbey Road win at GRAMMYs
Congratulations to Joyce DiDonato & Antonio Pappano on winning 'Best Classical Solo Vocal Album' at last night's Grammy Awards for their excellent 'Joyce & Tony - Live From Wigmore Hall'

The album was recorded on site at Wigmore Hall by our mobile unit, senior recording engineers Jonathan Allen and Richard Hale, pictured here on location at the session (far right hand side).

Best wishes also go to Eliane Elias who scooped up 'Best Latin Jazz Album' for 'Made In Brazil' - strings on the release were recorded in Studio One, again by our very own Jonathan Allen, and arranged and conducted by Rob Mathes.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road and Waves release the legendary Plates Reverb

15-02-2016
Abbey Road and Waves release the legendary Plates Reverb
Abbey Road Studios and Waves are very proud to announce the arrival of the Plates Reverb plugin. First installed in 1957 the historic Reverb Plates were used prominently at the Studios throughout the ‘60s & 70s by pioneering bands, including the Beatles and Pink Floyd, and for the first time ever they are now available to artists, engineers and producers worldwide.

Waves and Abbey Road Studios have created meticulous models of these stunning and unique-sounding units which continue to be used on everything from classical and film to pop and rock recordings to this day.

To get your hands on Abbey Road’s Plates Reverb plugin, click here.
Share with your friends on:

Miles Showell talks to The Independent about 'half speed' mastering

15-02-2016
Miles Showell talks to The Independent about 'half speed' mastering
“It takes forever, more than four times as long as cutting a normal record..."

Abbey Road engineer Miles Showell, one of the world’s leading exponents of half-speed cutting, chats to The Independent about his work breathing new life into classic albums by The BeatlesThe Rolling StonesQueen and more.

Read the full article here.
Share with your friends on:

Watch: Online Mastering at Abbey Road Studios

12-02-2016
Following its recent relaunch at the Studios, Abbey Road mastering engineer Christian Wright takes us through the studio's new and improved online mastering service.

Mastering is the final process in the chain of music production in which a mixed track is made to sound the best that it possibly can in every playback situation as well as across multiple tracks in an EP or album release.

Online mastering allows anyone to have access to Abbey Road's world class mastering team and equipment as if they were right here in the Studios from the comfort of their own home.

Submit your tracks for mastering at Abbey Road right here.
Share with your friends on:

Online Mastering Relaunches

05-02-2016
Online Mastering Relaunches
We have just launched a new, improved online mastering service with a completely rebuilt, more elegant file-sharing interface that allows users to send and receive tracks more easily. The result is a faster, thoroughly modern service allowing musicians around the globe easier access to the studio’s world-class equipment and internationally renowned team of engineers, with feedback and communication between customers and engineers at the heart of the experience.

Prices starts at £90 ex VAT (approx US $130) for a single stereo track. For more information head over to abbeyroad.com/online-mastering

[Press Release available here]
 
Share with your friends on:

Peter Cobbin Prints Available

07-01-2016
Peter Cobbin Prints Available
Recognise these famous dials?
 
This is a close-up of the infamous TG12345 Mk.II mixing console at Abbey Road. The first ever soild-state console from EMI, it epitomized the sound revolution of the 1960s and 1970s with its unique EQ and famous compressor/limiter. It was used to mix some of the biggest, era defining albums of the time including The Beatles’ Abbey Road album as well as Pink Floyd’s Dark Side Of The Moon, and later on solo albums by John Lennon and Kate Bush.
 
This detailed shot comes from a selection of limited edition prints photographed by Peter Cobbin (Director of Engineering at Abbey Road Studios) are now available to purchase online and in-store exclusively from the Abbey Road Shop.
 
The 6 unique black and white prints give detail on some of the custom made and vintage equipment in use at the Studios. All prints are framed as well as signed by Peter Cobbin.
 
Have a browse at shop.abbeyroad.com.
Share with your friends on:

Watch: Mastering at Abbey Road Studios

16-12-2015
Award winning Abbey Road mastering engineers Geoff Pesche and Miles Showell explain what makes the mastering process at the Studios unique. 

www.abbeyroad.com/mastering
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Red Incubator

03-12-2015
Abbey Road Red Incubator
Abbey Road Red are now accepting applications for the March 2016 intake of their music tech incubation program, the UK's first. Deadline for applications Friday 18th December 2015.
Click here to watch video. 
Share with your friends on:

Seasonal Bundles Have Arrived At The Shop!

27-11-2015
Seasonal Bundles Have Arrived At The Shop!
It might be getting colder and darker by the day here in London, but that's no reason to feel glum. The Abbey Road Shop is offering a series of winter warmer bundles, both online and in-store, to fill up your audio aficionado stockings and light up the winter months ahead!
 
We’ve got everything from Abbey Road guitar straps and “I am the eggman” egg cups to engineer approved china mugs, Studio chocolates and specially designed playing cards. The bundles come in four different forms including Seasonal Studio Essentials, Studio Survival Kit, Session Musician Starter Pack and a Student Study Bundle.
 
If you’ve yet to visit the shop it’s located right next to the entrance to the Studios (as well as online) and you can purchase all sorts of Abbey Road Studios related bits and pieces – from Abbey Road Red’s pick of miniature synths to Beatles figurines, classic 12” Beatles LPs, crossing cushions, t shirts, graffiti notebooks and much more.
 
Have a browse at shop.abbeyroad.com
Share with your friends on:

The Abbey Road Shop

03-11-2015
The Abbey Road Shop
The Abbey Road Shop is officially open for business.

Selling everything from T shirts and merchandise to vinyl and stationery, the shop will be open 7 days a week from 9.30 to 17.30 on Monday to Saturday, and 10.00 to 17.00 on Sunday. The entrance is located to the front right of the Studios

If you're coming to visit the Studios or crossing, then why not stop by and have a look around?

Of course if you can't make it in person, then you can always visit the online store right here.
Share with your friends on:

Watch: Recording and Mixing at Abbey Road

03-11-2015
Abbey Road recording engineers Andrew Dudman, Matt Mysko and Sam Okell explain what makes recording and mixing at the Studios unique.

Find out more about Abbey Road's world class recording & mixing team right here.
 
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road meets Alan Parsons

29-10-2015
Abbey Road meets Alan Parsons
Ahead of his forthcoming Sleeve Notes lecture series “From Mono To Infinity” in Studio Two this November we took some time out with legendary musician and ex-Abbey Road engineer Alan Parsons to ask him some of your questions submitted online about his time in The Alan Parsons Project as well as as an engineer working on classic albums including Pink Floyd’s Dark Side Of The Moon and The Beatles’ Abbey Road.
 
@Tom5576 - When you were growing up, what music were you listening to?
It started with the pop of the late 50s and early 60s on Radio Luxembourg - the only way to hear pop music. The Light Programme, the predecessor of Radio 1 hardly played any records because they were restricted from doing so by the Musicians’ Union.
 
Benjamin Thiessen (Facebook) - Does the convenience of digital recording contribute to a creative process or is being creative not dependent on a certain way of recording?
Even digital tape recorders allowed us to time shift and cut and paste which was really difficult in analog days. On hard disc it’s a piece of cake to do such things. I’d say it’s more time-saving than contributing to the creative process. I still follow old school principles in the digital age.
 
@Astraux_ - How did you get the vocals to sound so nice and so wide on pyramid? Plus – got any vocal recording secrets?
Thank you but no particular secrets except good singers, good mics, good limiters (Fairchild)
 
@tatioldfield - What are the current challenges for new record producers and sound engineers in terms of technology?
Hard to keep up with the myriad of new products. I listen to people who use DAWs/computers all day every day. You can’t use everything.
 
‏@mihajlopopovic - Any plans on releasing "fly on the wall" MCTS videos? Would be well worth paying for.
Possibly - There’s a lot of footage and the editing would be a challenge. I think most of the value of MCTSs is being there.
 
@christophermh44 - Music is expensive…any advice for a cheap sound engineer starter kit?
Good monitor speakers are what I would spend the most on. Next a good condenser mic, and next the best possible acoustics in your recording area.
 
@christophermh44 - What are your favourite decades in terms of audio mixing?
I think the 70s and 80s both had a distinctive and evolving style. There have been great recordings in every decade.
 
@HutchbBen - What's your favourite memory of working on the Beatles' Abbey Road album?
Working with Paul on Oh Darlin’ - he would come in at 2pm every day and sing it a couple of times until he finally got the take he liked.
 
@RuchieC711 – Would you have tweaked any songs by The Beatles or Pink Floyd to make them fit with today’s technology?
If only I had been given the opportunity to do so - quite possibly!
 
@TMB_Virtual - What actual recording system (or tool) would you recommend to record analog sound?
You need to read or watch The Art And Science Of Sound Recording!
 
@chip_uni - In "In the Lap of the Gods", what WERE the background singers singing?
“Hail to The King, Praise To The King, Hail to The King and Glory To His Name Forever - Hosannah - Gloria"
 
Robert Shorkey (Facebook) - What are the main microphones you use today?
I have discovered some mics from Nashville called MikTech which are amazing. I also favour Neumanns - notably the Km84 and AKG dynamics.
 
Gianmarco Baudazzi (Facebook) - Which are your future musical plans ?
Mostly live shows, although I am giving consideration to a new album but no solid plans yet.

Got a question for Alan Parsons?

Tickets are available for his Sleeve Notes lecture series in Studio Two this November in conjunction with Technics, which includes a Q&A, right here.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road and Chandler release the RS124 Compressor

28-10-2015
Abbey Road and Chandler release the RS124 Compressor
First designed in 1960 by Abbey Road Head of Technical Bill Livey, Deputy Head Len Page and seasoned EMI Audio Designer Mike Batchelor, the EMI/Abbey Road RS124 compressor is one of the most coveted pieces of recording equipment ever developed.

Still in use today at Abbey Road Studios, though most recognized for its use at virtually every Beatles recording session in the 1960s, the RS124’s true inner-workings have managed to remain an enigma to recording engineers to this day. Through the years, from incomplete information and supposition, some have tried to recreate the RS124 compressor, though no one has ever fully realized or replicated this elusive signal processor - until now.
 
To learn more about the RS124 compressor, click here.
Share with your friends on:

Introducing Abbey Road Red

23-10-2015
Introducing Abbey Road Red
Abbey Road Studios are very proud to announce the launch of Abbey Road Red - a brand new forward thinking department that will focus on music technology and innovation at the Studios and beyond.
 
Abbey Road Red builds on a history of ground-breaking technological advances at the studios that started when the studios opened back in 1931 as the world’s first ever purpose-built recording complex. The original REDD (with two “D’s”) department stood for Record Engineering Development Department and was founded back in 1955 to work closely with the Abbey Road recording engineers and push the boundaries of recording technology to meet the demands of ambitious artists and producers.
 
Abbey Road Red looks to continue this legacy for 2015, launching as an open innovation department designed to support the endeavours of the brightest music tech entrepreneurs, researchers and developers.
 
Backed up by parent company, Universal Music, Red runs Europe’s only music tech specific incubator program, with the London based Titan Reality signed up as the first company to get help from Red. Titan Reality are due to launch their patented 3D sensing musical controller the Pulse the coming weeks.

Last night's launch party included a demonstration of Titan Reality's Pulse in action in Studio Two as the opening of a tech fair that featured displays from exciting music tech companies including Visualise, Jukedeck, mi.mu and Mogees as well as performances from Matthew Herbert and Hyperdub label boss Kode9.
 
Fancy getting involved? For more information on how Red can help you with your start-up or research idea click here, or to apply for their incubation program click here.
 
Keep up to date on the latest updates from Red by following them on Twitter @AbbeyRoadRed
Share with your friends on:

Alan Parsons presents Sleeve Notes: From Mono To Infinity

22-10-2015
Alan Parsons presents Sleeve Notes: From Mono To Infinity
Abbey Road Studios is opening its doors to the public this November to host a series of lectures in conjunction with Technics under the name ‘Sleeve Notes: From Mono To Infinity’ presented by acclaimed music producer and recording engineer (plus one-time Vice-President of the Studios…) Alan Parsons.

During the talks he will be opening up about the development of his own skills and experience as an engineer, producer and recording artist at Abbey Road, placing these alongside the ongoing developments in music technology at the Studios that allowed him and others to create such ground-breaking records that continue to survive the test of time.

The talks will include audio, footage, photos and the vintage studio equipment used to create some of his and the Studios’ classic tracks. They will also include an audience Q&A co-hosted by David Hepworth whose journalistic and TV credits include work for The Guardian, NME, Q, Mojo and The Old Grey Whistle Test.

Alan Parsons' career at Abbey Road began when he was a trainee engineer on The Beatles’ final two albums, ‘Let It Be’ and ‘Abbey Road,’ and he went on to handle mixing duties on both Pink Floyd’s, ‘Atom Heart Mother’ and ‘Dark Side Of The Moon.’ As an artist and producer in his own right in the Alan Parsons Project he went on to record a series of memorable works throughout the 70s and 80s at Abbey Road including ‘Tales Of Mystery And Imagination’, ‘I Robot’, and ‘Eye In The Sky’.

Tickets are available here.

In between the weekend Alan will be bringing his popular recording masterclasses ‘Master Class Training Sessions’ to Abbey Road. Based on his award winning ‘Art and Science of Sound Recording’ video series and book, MCTS events offer attendees the chance to literally make a record with Alan Parsons in the studio.

He will also take time out of his schedule to deliver a private lecture exclusively for students at Abbey Road Institute, the Studios’ brand new audio engineering and music production education facility which opens later this month.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Red presents Titan Reality

22-10-2015
Abbey Road Red presents Titan Reality
Say hello to Titan Reality, the first company to join our incubation program. We met Titan Reality back in August 2015 while we were setting up our incubator, and were so impressed that we decided to invite them to jump the queue and join the program before we even opened applications to the public.
 
Titan Reality are developing advanced musical interfaces and instruments using patented 3D sensing technologies. After 4 years of R&D, the company are now ready to start launching their hardware and software products.
 
Unlike other musical controllers their first product, the Pulse*, tracks movement and shapes in 3 dimensions, so can sense the size of any object placed over it, as well as its speed and position, allowing users to control software with really fine and expressive detail using just their hands - or whatever else they chose to place over its highly responsive sensors.
 
But that’s just the start. Titan Reality have big ambitions – their software platform, built from the ground up to run on most platforms, gives users access to a vast and ever expanding library of instruments and effects, including rare drums and other equipment.
 
We are looking forward to working alongside Titan Reality over the coming months.

 
Share with your friends on:

Google Presents: Inside Abbey Road

21-10-2015
Google Presents: Inside Abbey Road

Inside Abbey Road is an interactive experience that lets fans around the world explore the legendary studios, hear its stories and play with some of its famous equipment right from their computer, tablet or phone.

Inside Abbey Road is a new site created by Google and Abbey Road Studios, which lets people explore every nook and cranny of the three main studios and one mastering suite for the first time. Throughout the site, there are more than 150 different 360-degree panoramic images for visitors to explore. As they walk through the studios, they'll see YouTube videos and archival images from Abbey Road's history- right where it originally happened. From footage of Elgar and the London Symphony Orchestra opening the studios in 1931 to Jay Z discussing his Magna Carta album with Zane Lowe. Users can even play with pioneering equipment in specially designed interactive gadgets, such as the J37 4-track recorder that was used to record The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. 
For your chance to step Inside Abbey Road, click here.

Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road's Guide To Glastonbury 2015

13-10-2015
Abbey Road's Guide To Glastonbury 2015

Whether it’s as a recording studio, live music venue or for mastering, here’s a brief list of some ways in which this year’s Glastonbury headliners have made use of Abbey Road Studios over time, as well as a rundown of some of our favourite acts playing the main stages this year.

Sure to be a sing-along favourite on Sunday, Lionel Richie’s easy-listening hit “Easy” as part of the Commodores was mastered for UK release on 7” single in 1977 by Abbey Road for the Motown Record Corporation. Abbey Road Studios would go on to master a series of Motown records for UK release throughout the rest of the 1970s.

A few years before they received more mainstream success in the mid-1980s, The Waterboys’ eponymous debut album released in 1983 – that eventually got them signed to Island Records paving the way for things to come - was mastered at Abbey Road. Later, during the mid-1990s, one of Motorhead’s earliest and rawest releases 1975’s “On Parole” was also digitally mixed and remastered by Abbey Road engineers.

Most of Belle & Sebastian’s album output from the 2000s (right up to their most recent release “Girls In Peacetime Want To Dance” earlier in 2015) was mastered at the hands of Abbey Road engineers, as were various releases by the Chemical Brothers, and the past 10 years have also seen Paul Weller, Alabama Shakes, The xx, James Bay, La Roux, Ella Eyre and Gorgon City all stop by to do live performances and interviews in the Studios.

Below is our pick of this year’s top headliners and up and coming acts, all of who have passed through our doors at one point or another to record some incredible studio works.

Florence + The Machine

Florence + The Machine recorded large parts of their breakthrough 2011 album “Ceremonials” at Abbey Road Studios, including live footage from recording for the video for single ”What The Water Gave Me.” They’ll be headlining the Pyramid Stage on Friday night.

Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road and Sonos

13-10-2015
Abbey Road and Sonos

Abbey Road and Sonos are coming together to explore the method and magic behind music creation, developing a better understanding of each other's worlds in order to reduce the distance between studio recording and home listening.
 

It all started last night with an intimate Sonos Studio London gig in Abbey Road's Studio Two, featuring the debut live performance from producer Max Cooper alongside pianist Tom Hodge.
 

To find out more about the event as well what's to come head over to blogs.sonos.com

Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Golden Globe win & Oscar nominations

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Golden Globe win & Oscar nominations
Awards season continues, with both Golden Globe winners and Oscar nominations announced this month.

Congratulations are in order for Johan Johansson, whose score to The Theory of Everything picked up Best Score at the Golden Globes. Recorded at Abbey Road, the score is nominated in the same category at the Oscars.

Other Abbey Road projects in the running for Best Score at the Oscars include Alexandre Desplat's music for The Grand Budapest Hotel and The Imitation Game, and Hans Zimmer's score to Interstellar.

The Theory of Everything, The Grand Budapest Hotel and The Imitation Game are also up for several other gongs, including Best Picture.

Don't forget to tune in to watch the live broadcast of the awards on 22nd February.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road and Chandler Limited release REDD.47

13-10-2015
Abbey Road and Chandler Limited release REDD.47
23 January 2015

The REDD.47 was introduced as the all-purpose amplifier component for EMI's legendary REDD.51 mixing console. The REDD.47 microphone pre-amplifier, considered a 'holy grail' to some, is most closely associated with the sound of The Beatles' music recorded in Abbey Road's Studio Two between 1964 and 1968.

Chandler Limited and Abbey Road Studios have now revived this legendary piece of kit with their new hardware incarnation. The punchy, aggressive sound of the original pre-amplifier has been preserved, while new features required for the rigors of today’s recording studio environment have been added. These extraordinary pre-amplifiers are now shipping to dealers worldwide.

To learn more about the REDD.47 pre-amp, click here. Or if you'd like to listen to a sound clip of the kit in action, watch the video below.
Share with your friends on:

Noted Composer James Horner Dies In Tragic Accident

13-10-2015
 Noted Composer James Horner Dies In Tragic Accident
James Horner was an extraordinarily talented musician and composer who Abbey Road Studios had the privilege of working with over the years on major international films including Aliens, Braveheart, Willow and Iris to name but a few.

He will be very much missed by all of us who knew him here at the Studios.

Watch James in action recently here.
Share with your friends on:

Alan Dower Blumlein Honoured

13-10-2015
Alan Dower Blumlein Honoured
The ground-breaking work of Alan Dower Blumlein, the inventor of stereo sound recording, has been recognised with a Milestone honour from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world's largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation.

The plaque which will be permanently housed at Abbey Road honours the pioneering work of Alan Dower Blumlein- some of which was done at the Studios- and his enduring influence in recording technology. One of the most influential British engineers of the twentieth century, Alan Dower Blumlein also made significant advancements in telecommunications, television and airborne radar before his untimely death in an aircraft accident in 1942.

The citation that appears on the IEEE Milestone Plaque reads:

‘Alan Dower Blumlein filed a patent for a two-channel audio system called “stereo” on 14 December 1931. It included a “shuffling” circuit to preserve directional sound, an orthogonal “Blumlein Pair” of velocity microphones, the recording of two orthogonal channels in a single groove, stereo disc-cutting head, and hybrid transformer to mix directional signals. Blumlein brought his equipment to Abbey Road Studios in 1934 and recorded the London Philharmonic Orchestra.’

Born in Hampstead, London on 29th June 1903, Alan Dower Blumlein was one of the most prolific inventors of the twentieth century who transformed the worlds of audio and recording technology, television and airborne radar. In March 1929, aged 25, he joined Columbia Gramophone, one of the forerunners of EMI. During his time at Columbia and EMI he thrived as an incredibly inventive and innovative engineer, filing 121 patents in the space of 13 years. On 7th June 1942, when he was just 38, Alan Dower Blumlein’s life was cut tragically short in an aircraft accident as he was testing the H2S airborne radar system that he had developed and which was soon deployed throughout the RAF’s fleet.

Check out the rarely seen early stereo test footage ‘Trains at Hayes.’

 Picture courtesy of EMI Archive Trust
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Institute

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Institute
Abbey Road Institute is a new international educational initiative from Abbey Road Studios. The 12-month Advanced Diploma in Music Production and Sound Engineering is aimed at students aged 18 and over, in locations around the world including the UK, Germany and Australia.

The bespoke curriculum, developed with Abbey Road Studios engineers, offers a unique mix of theoretical and practical modules. This programme is designed to equip students for their first step toward a professional audio engineering and production career.

The London institute will be housed at the renowned North London studio complex inside purpose-built classrooms, providing students with access to Abbey Road’s hallowed recording spaces, control rooms and equipment.

Additional Abbey Road Institutes will launch in Berlin, Munich, Melbourne and Sydney for September 2015, with more to follow. Abbey Road Institute is now accepting applications for a limited number of places in the September 2015 intake at all locations. Find out more at www.abbeyroadinstitute.com
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Grammy & Golden Globe nominations

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Grammy & Golden Globe nominations
The Grammy and Golden Globe nominations have now been announced, with several Abbey Road projects in the running for the awards.

Mastering Engineer Miles Showell is up for Record of the Year at the Grammys, for his work on 'Fancy' (Iggy Azalea ft. Charli XCX). Several other projects mastered by Miles are also nominated, including Iggy's album 'The New Classic' and dance anthem 'Faded' by Zhu.

On the recording side, 'I See Fire' by Ed Sheeran is shortlisted for Best Song Written for Visual Media. The track was recorded and mixed by Abbey Road's Peter Cobbin and Kirsty Whalley, and again mastered by Miles.

Several film projects we've worked on are in the running for the award for Best Score: Gravity at the Grammys, and The Imitation Game, The Theory of Everything and Interstellar at the Golden Globes.

Congratulations to everyone on their nominations - fingers crossed for some Abbey Road wins!

 
Share with your friends on:

The Imitation Game recorded & mixed at Abbey Road

13-10-2015
The Imitation Game recorded & mixed at Abbey Road
Critically acclaimed thriller The Imitation Game hit no.2 in the UK box office chart this month. Alexandre Desplat's score was recorded in Studio One and mixed in the Penthouse by Peter Cobbin, with Kirsty Whalley as supervising Music Editor and Toby Hulbert as Recordist.

Watch the trailer below:
Share with your friends on:

Colette Barber honoured at APRS Awards

13-10-2015
Colette Barber honoured at APRS Awards
Our amazing Studio Manager Colette Barber was presented with a Sound Fellowship at the APRS Awards this afternoon.
The APRS (Association of Professional Recording Services) Sound Fellowship is a prestigious accolade, awarded to individuals who have made a ‘significant contribution to the art, science or business of sound recording’.

Previous recipients of the award include Sir Paul McCartney, Sir George Martin, David Gilmour, Nile Rodgers, Quincy Jones, Peter Gabriel and Colette’s first boss, Ken Townsend.

Colette started at Abbey Road 35 years ago, working her way up within a year from accounts temp to Studio Bookings Manager, and has played an integral role in making the studios what they are today.

She has often gone above and beyond the call of duty – perhaps most notably in 1988, when Pink Floyd were due to commence remixing Delicate Sound of Thunder in Studio Three, but builders refurbishing the bathroom had fallen behind schedule. Disaster was averted when Colette stepped in and finished grouting the tiles herself!

It’s fantastic to see her receive recognition for her huge contribution to the success of the studios. Congratulations Colette, from everyone at Abbey Road.

 
Share with your friends on:

Alexandre Desplat & Daniel Pemberton awards success

13-10-2015
Alexandre Desplat & Daniel Pemberton awards success

Alexandre Desplat and Daniel Pemberton were honoured at the World Soundtrack Awards in Ghent this month, winning Best Film Composer of the Year and Discovery of the Year respectively.
 

Alexandre won Best Film Composer of the Year for his scores to Grand Budapest Hotel, Godzilla, The Monuments Men, Venus in Fur, Philomena, Zulu and Marius, several of which were recorded or mixed at Abbey Road Studios.
 

The Discovery of the Year award celebrates emerging film composing talent, and was awarded to Daniel in recognition of his scores for Cuban Fury and the Counsellor, both recorded at Abbey Road.
 

Huge congratulations to Alexandre, Daniel and all the other winners from everyone at Abbey Road! You can check out the full list here.

Share with your friends on:

Interstellar goes stratospheric at UK box office

13-10-2015
Interstellar goes stratospheric at UK box office
Part of Hans Zimmer’s score to the film was recorded at Temple Church in London, by Abbey Road Studios’ location recording unit.

The recording engineer for the sessions was Geoff Foster, assisted by Abbey Road’s John Barrett and Jon Alexander. Richard Hale, Matt Kingdon and Dan Cole were on hand to provide technical assistance.

Interstellar is out now in cinemas worldwide. Watch the trailer here:
Share with your friends on:

Guardians of the Galaxy rules Box Office Chart

13-10-2015
Guardians of the Galaxy rules Box Office Chart

Guardians of the Galaxy made its box office debut at the weekend, shooting straight to no.1 on both sides of the Atlantic.
 

The film smashed records in the US, where it scored the biggest ever opening weekend for an August release.
 

Tyler Bates’ score was recorded by Abbey Road’s Andrew Dudman in Studio One, assisted by Lewis Jones and Matt Jones.
 

Check out the film trailer below:

Share with your friends on:

Waves and Abbey Road Studios release TG12345 plugin

13-10-2015
Waves and Abbey Road Studios release TG12345 plugin
Waves Audio and Abbey Road Studios bring to life the legendary TG12345, the first-ever solid state console from EMI which epitomized the sound evolution of the late '60s and early '70s and helped shape ground breaking recordings by the Beatles, Pink Floyd, and many others.

Click here for more info.
Share with your friends on:

Live Here Now on the road with Robbie Williams

13-10-2015
Live Here Now on the road with Robbie Williams

Abbey Road's Live Here Now team has just returned from accompanying Robbie Williams on his Swings Both Ways Live arena tour, recording a total of 38 dates across Europe. 
 

The run of shows saw Robbie perform tracks from his latest album Swings Both Ways, which was recorded in part at Abbey Road Studios, alongside swing-inspired interpretations of his classic hits.
 

The tour culminated in four sold-out nights at London's O2 arena, lauded as 'preposterously entertaining' by the Guardian.
 

The live recording of Robbie's performance was available to purchase at the end of each show, as a double CD album or MP3 download. Don't worry if you missed out - you can purchase your copy of any (or all!) of the dates here until 7th August.

Share with your friends on:

Half-speed mastering 'dubnobasswithmyheadman'

13-10-2015
Half-speed mastering 'dubnobasswithmyheadman'

To celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Underworld's 'dubnobasswithmyheadman', the record has been meticulously remastered by Miles Showell for a deluxe reissue on CD and vinyl, working closely with Rick Smith.
 

For the double vinyl LP, Miles used a specialist technique known as half-speed mastering. This process transforms difficult to cut high-end frequencies into relatively easy to cut mid-range frequencies, resulting in cuts that have excellent high frequency response (treble) and very solid and stable stereo images. In short, a high quality master that helps the pressing plant create a high quality record.
 

Cutting vinyl at half-speed requires adapted lathes: one of Abbey Road Studios' Neumann VMS-80 lathes has been modified to accommodate this highly specialised process.
 

The deluxe 'dubnobasswithmyheadman' vinyl reissue is out on 6th October - pre-order your copy here.

Share with your friends on:

‘Venus and Mars’ & ‘At The Speed of Sound’ remastered

13-10-2015
‘Venus and Mars’ & ‘At The Speed of Sound’ remastered
Wings' classic albums ‘Venus and Mars’ and ‘At The Speed Of Sound’ have been remastered at Abbey Road for deluxe re-issue.

‘Venus and Mars’ was remastered by Steve Rooke and Sam Okell, and ‘At The Speed of Sound’ was remastered by Steve Rooke and Guy Massey.

The re-issues will include bonus audio including demos and unreleased tracks, mastered by Alex Wharton. Audio restoration for the projects was carried out by Simon Gibson.

The albums will be available on CD (as both standard and deluxe editions), vinyl and download.

Check out the unboxing videos for the deluxe editions below.
Share with your friends on:

Top Ten most Technically Innovative Beatles Songs

13-10-2015
Top Ten most Technically Innovative Beatles Songs

Brian Kehew and Kevin Ryan, co-authors of 'Recording the Beatles', have compiled a list of the top ten most technically innovative Beatles songs for Mojo magazine.
 

As they explain, "The group's remarkable thirst for newness, allied with the ingenuity of their producers and engineers at EMI's Abbey Road Studios, gave rise to cutting-edge sonics and daring studio exploration - now often taken for granted."
 

Check out the top ten here.
 

Brian and Kevin will be speaking at 'The Sound of Abbey Road Studios' events this weekend, along with Beatles engineer Ken Scott. The last few tickets are available here.

Share with your friends on:

Record Store Day 2014 at Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
Record Store Day 2014 at Abbey Road Studios

Record Store Day takes place on 19th April this year, with hundreds of special limited edition vinyl releases available for one day only. Abbey Road Studios' vinyl mastering and cutting engineers are proud to have played a role in helping create records by a fantastic set of artists for the day, including The Sex Pistols, Coldplay, Grace Jones and Lily Allen.

Releases also include a special 7" by the legendary bassist, songwriter and singer Jack Bruce (pictured in Studio Three), best known as one third of the seminal band Cream.

The vinyl release features a Record Store Day exclusive on the a-side called Fields Of Forever, and the b-side Drone is taken from new album Silver Rails, which was produced by Rob Cass and recorded and mixed at Abbey Road Studios.

The Temperance Movement paid tribute to Blur and Oasis, recording two covers in Studio Two especially for Record Store Day.

You can check out the full list of releases mastered or cut to vinyl at Abbey Road below. Be sure to get to your local record shop nice and early on 19th April to pick up the most sought-after items. Good luck!

Lily Allen – Wind Your Neck In (7”)

Jack Bruce - a) ‘Fields of Forever’ b) ‘Drone’ (7”)

Chrissie Hynde - ‘Dark Sunglasses’ (7")

Coldplay - ‘Midnight’ (7”)

Diana Dors - ‘So Little Time’ (7”)

Marianne Faithfull - ‘Sister Morphine’ (7”)

Gloria Jones - ‘Tainted Love’ (7")

Grace Jones - ‘Me! I Disconnect from You’ (12")

Kylie - ‘Golden Boy’ (7”)

Ronnie Lane & Slim Chance - ‘Ooh La La’ (alt take, take 4) (7")

John Martyn - ‘May You Never’ (7”)

PiL - ‘Death Disco’ (12”)

Sex Pistols - ‘Never Mind the B*llocks’ boxed set (7 x 7”)

The Temperance Movement – a) ‘Tender’ b)’Up in the Sky’ (7”)

Share with your friends on:

Paul McCartney's 'Hope' confirmed for release

13-10-2015
Paul McCartney's 'Hope' confirmed for release
Recorded in Abbey Road's Studio One and Studio Two, Paul McCartney's 'Hope' has been confirmed for release later this year.

Produced by Giles Martin, 'Hope' is taken from the most highly anticipated video game of the year, 'Destiny'. In addition to the end title theme song, Paul has also contributed to the in-game music. You can find out more at PaulMcCartney.com

'Destiny' was created by Bungie, the studio behind Halo, and published by Activision, the company behind Call of Duty. Check out the game trailer below.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Meets... Ken Scott

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Meets... Ken Scott
We put your questions to renowned former Abbey Road engineer Ken Scott this week.

Ken is one of the speakers at ‘The Sound of Abbey Road Studios’ events, where he will return to the very room where he worked on his first session nearly 50 years ago: The Beatles putting the finishing touches to their album ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ in Studio Two.

An esteemed engineer, producer and pivotal figure in Abbey Road Studios’ history, Ken has also worked with Pink Floyd, Jeff Beck, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie and Lou Reed, to name but a few.

Thank you to everyone who participated and sent in questions; the standard was high and it was tough choosing which ones to put to him. Here is the interview in full.

When you worked with the Beatles all those years ago did you know then how special they were or about to become? - ‏@eskinator, via Twitter

When I started to work with them on side two of A Hard Day’s Night, they were already huge and so I already knew they were special. But no-one, not even them, thought they would become part of history and still being talked about and finding new fans 50 years on.

What was it like working with John and Paul? - Mason Blake Lewis, via Facebook

Exactly as it would seem. Mind blowing, frustrating, great fun and boring.

What was the one Beatles song you were most proud to work on? - @LauraCW1, via Twitter

I'm sorry, but there isn't one. I'm proud to have worked on all of the recordings I made with them.

What was the hardest track to engineer that The Beatles ever recorded? - @mikethomas1959, via Twitter

The Fool on the Hill. It was hard, not because of the Beatles, but because we tried a method of running two four track machines in sync and it didn't work. The problem was that we didn't know it didn't work until it became time to mix.

What do you think of the Beatles’ progress in the 60s, were they really ahead of their time? - Luj Rosanna Felecio, via Facebook

First and foremost, they were amazingly talented: each of the four in their own way. They were incredible learners and great experimenters. They pushed themselves and everyone around them to new limits. Ahead of their time? I don't know about that. But they were certainly of their time.

What is the one engineering decision from that period you wish you could change? Which one song, and why? - Randall Yeager, via Facebook

There isn't one. By that, I mean there isn't just one. I find fault with everything I've done - some minor faults, others not so minor - but I know that if I had the chance to revisit everything and correct those faults, I would very quickly find others. If I ever become totally satisfied with something I've done, I will have nothing to strive for in the future.

How much was [The Beatles’] transition from live touring to strictly studio work influenced by a desire to explore other genres? Examples being circus fanfare in ‘Mr Kite’, the orchestral work of ‘A Day in the Life’, or even more whimsical work like ‘Martha My Dear’ and ‘Honey Pie’. - Andrew A. Morisey, via Facebook

It wasn’t a discussion I ever had with any of them but, if I remember correctly, in interviews they stated they were fed up playing live because they couldn’t hear themselves. I’m sure that freedom from having to play their music on stage enabled their imaginations to run wild, and come up with things like you mention.

Do you think you would have enjoyed the same level of success had you not worked on the Beatles’ sessions? - Sean Juillard, via Facebook

That particular band at the head of one's resumé does no harm.

Were there similarities in the way the Beatles and Pink Floyd used to work? - @Soofijulian, via Twitter

Very much so. They all liked to experiment and once in the studio it was time to get to work.

What was your favourite album to work on and why? - @PotardDechaine, via Twitter

I like 95% of all that I’ve done, all for different reasons, so it’s impossible to pick one over all the rest. And by the way, the 5% I don’t like you have never heard of so it really doesn’t matter.

Did you develop any hardware at Abbey Road? - Ricardo Inclan, via Facebook

My training at EMI was all to do with the sound, not the electronics, so I left anything to do with that to the amazing ‘Amp Room’ guys.

What do you feel is more important, the mic or the preamp? - @dvguitarist, via Twitter

I have no preference. To me, the important things in a studio are the monitors. If you don’t hear a true sound, you can use the best gear in the world and get a bad-sounding end product. But if you hear everything properly, you can work and get a really good sound out of even second-rate gear.

In your opinion, did the equipment matter, or could [the Beatles’] records have been made on any gear and still been great because of their talent? - Fast Freddy Rapillo, via Facebook

In the beginning: talent, talent, talent and Sir George. But Norman Smith laid the groundwork by showing the band how good sounds enhanced their music, and put them on the path to their later work; which would certainly not have been as good without talent, talent, talent, Sir George, the great gear, the Amp Room (the technical wizards) and of course, being somewhat biased, the engineers.

When bands have internal strife, are they more receptive to the engineer’s input? - @bigmikem11, via Twitter

I haven’t found that to be true. If they have internal strife, the engineer might get one member to listen to his input, but another member will hate the idea just because the other member likes it.

How much do budgets impact the process of creating music? - ‏@DarrenJubbCA, via Twitter

As much as you let them.

What is the most valuable thing you learned while recording the Beatles that you were then able to apply to your work with other bands like Pink Floyd? - David Durling, via Facebook

The most valuable thing I learned was from George Martin more than the Beatles, and it only became important when I moved into production as opposed to engineering.

Talent should be allowed to do what talent is meant to do, create. One can guide but one shouldn’t control.

Can I have a REDD 51, please? - Bill Dillon, via Facebook

After I get mine.

Tickets for ‘The Sound of Abbey Road Studios’ are available here.
Share with your friends on:

Titanfall score recorded in Studio One and Studio Two

13-10-2015
Titanfall score recorded in Studio One and Studio Two

Respawn Entertainment’s Titanfall has shot to the top of the UK games chart, claiming the title of fastest-selling game of the year so far.
 

The score to Titanfall was composed by Stephen Barton and recorded by Abbey Road’s Jonathan Allen in Studio One and Studio Two.
 

Within the game players must choose between two factions; this was reflected in the recording process itself, with music for the opposing teams recorded in separate studios to help create different ‘sound worlds’.
 

As Stephen explains, “Studio One lent its warmth, richness and larger-than-life sound to the music for the Interstellar Mining Corporation, and the unmistakable clarity and depth of Studio Two brings a grittier, organic texture to the Militia sound.
 

“I can't think of anywhere better than Abbey Road, arguably the home of recorded music, to record London's finest musicians for the score to an epic futuristic battlefield.”
 

Titanfall is out now for PC, Xbox One and Xbox 360 - grab your copy here.

Share with your friends on:

Score to A Most Wanted Man recorded at Abbey Road

13-10-2015
Score to A Most Wanted Man recorded at Abbey Road
A Most Wanted Man hit UK cinemas this month, directed by Anton Corbijn and featuring an amazing performance by Philip Seymour Hoffman.

The score was written by Herbert Gronemeyer, produced by Alex Silva and recorded in Studio Two and mixed in the Penthouse by Abbey Road's Peter Cobbin.

Watch the film trailer below.
Share with your friends on:

Paolo Nutini performs new track Iron Sky in Studio Two

13-10-2015
Paolo Nutini performs new track Iron Sky in Studio Two

Paolo Nutini recently performed a cracking version of new track Iron Sky in Abbey Road's Studio Two.
 

The Youtube video of Paolo's performance has gone viral, with fans including singer Adele, who declared it to be "one of the best things I've ever seen in my life, hands down" to her 20 million followers on Twitter.
 

Check it out for yourself below:

Share with your friends on:

'A Hard Day's Night' – restored, remixed & remastered

13-10-2015
'A Hard Day's Night' – restored, remixed & remastered
For the fiftieth anniversary of its world premiere in London, The Beatles' film 'A Hard Day's Night' has been digitally restored in 4K resolution from the original camera negative by the Criterion Collection's restoration team.

The resulting image, approved by director Richard Lester, features a soundtrack remixed and remastered for 5.1 sound systems by Giles Martin and Sam Okell at Abbey Road Studios.

Available now on iTunes.
Share with your friends on:

Peabody and Sherman hits no.1

13-10-2015
Peabody and Sherman hits no.1

DreamWorks animation Peabody and Sherman, about a super-intelligent beagle and his pet boy, has shot straight to the top of the UK box office chart.
 

The score to the film was written by award-winning composer Danny Elfman and recorded by Abbey Road’s Director of Engineering, Peter Cobbin.
 

Peabody and Sherman was directed by Rob Minkhoff, the man behind Disney animation The Lion King.
 

Check out the trailer.

Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios & Chandler Limited present: TG2-500

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios & Chandler Limited present: TG2-500
Abbey Road Studios and Chandler Limited are pleased to announce the release of the new TG2-500 microphone pre amp. Building upon the popularity of the acclaimed TG2 pre amp, the new TG2-500 delivers the classic sound of Abbey Road’s TG12428 pre amp, used in the studios’ recording and mastering consoles in the late 60s and early 70s—in the 500 series format.

The Chandler TG2-500 delivers frequency response identical to the TG2 and has the same high frequency bump and mid forward tone, along with the warmth-inducing distortion which contributes to its sound. The end result is a creamy, smooth tone with a surprisingly open, clear top end.

The TG2-500 is available to order now. For pricing and to find your nearest dealer, please visit ChandlerLimited.com
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics
The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics took place this month, kicking off with a spectacular opening ceremony featuring music recorded by Abbey Road Studios' Director of Engineering, Peter Cobbin.

Peter recorded a wide range of performers on location in Moscow, including Russian orchestras, ensembles, soloists and choirs. He then mixed the music at Abbey Road Studios alongside Kirsty Whalley, with additional mixing and editing by Andrew Dudman and Rob Houston.

The Abbey Road team also set up a temporary studio inside the stadium at Sochi, where they continued to mix and edit with the creative directors and producers during rehearsals, right up until the opening ceremony itself.

Also key to the London team working in Russia were music editor Kirsty and production co-ordinator Vanessa Ainsworth. The operation was led by talented British composer Matthew Herbert, who took on the role of music director for the ceremony.

In addition to recording the music used for the opening ceremony, Abbey Road produced many segments that were used for the closing ceremony.

Peter said, "It was a fabulous experience to be involved in, helping create music for a very complex, intricate and elaborate production. Our team's responsibilities involved making all the music work for both the huge stadium sound system and the international broadcast watched by millions."
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road wins at the Grammys, Oscars & BAFTAs

13-10-2015
Abbey Road wins at the Grammys, Oscars & BAFTAs
The 86th Academy Awards took place last night, with Gravity winning an amazing seven awards including Best Score and Best Director.

Steven Price's score to the film was recorded in Studio One and Studio Two by Andrew Dudman and Sam Okell, with Lewis Jones as Recordist. The CD soundtrack was mastered by Christian Wright.

Gravity also received recognition at the BAFTAs last month, picking up six awards including Original Music and Best British Film.

Another Abbey Road Studios project, Skyfall, was victorious at the Grammys in January, winning Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media and Best Song Written for Visual Media.

Thomas Newman's score was recorded by Simon Rhodes in Studio One, while Adele's theme was recorded in Studio Two. The CD soundtrack was mastered by Simon Gibson.

Congratulations to everyone who worked on the projects.
Share with your friends on:

Garritan Abbey Road Studios CFX Concert Grand

13-10-2015
Garritan Abbey Road Studios CFX Concert Grand
We placed the awe-inspiring Yamaha CFX Concert Grand Piano in Abbey Road Studios' Studio One, where award-winning engineers used the world’s greatest microphones and equipment to create a stunning virtual instrument.

Every facet of this project reflects the perfection that only the most passionate can produce: the instrument, the room, the engineers, and the mics. Click here for more info.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios & Waves Audio announce Reel ADT

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios & Waves Audio announce Reel ADT
We are proud to announce our new plugin created with Waves Audio, Reel ADT.

Waves/Abbey Road Reel ADT is the first plugin to successfully emulate Abbey Road Studios’ pioneering process of Artificial Double Tracking. The effect that would become an integral part of Abbey Road’s signature sound was initially created at the studios in the 1960s to meet the needs of some very special clients: The Beatles.

Reel ADT puts the magic of that era in your hands within seconds. Using its intuitive controls, you can advance or push back the doubled signal to achieve genuine, lush-sounding delay and pitch variations. You can also drive each of the signals separately to add beautiful tape saturations.

With its authentic modelled valve tape machine sound and faithful emulation of wow and flutter, this extraordinary plugin can enhance any track with the impression of two separate takes, giving you results as close as possible to real double tracking. Other classic Abbey Road tape effects such as flanging and phasing can also be achieved with ease.

All the character, depth and panoramic sound of this inimitable classic effect can now be created digitally, simply and authentically.

You can download a demo or purchase your copy here.

Watch the video below to find out more about the invention of ADT.
Share with your friends on:

The Abbey Road Plugin Collection - out now

13-10-2015
The Abbey Road Plugin Collection - out now
Developed in association with Waves Audio, the Abbey Road Collection features a lineup of exquisite plugins that meticulously model our legendary microphones, consoles, tape machines and signature effects, as heard on countless historic recordings and pop masterpieces.

The Abbey Road Collection includes the acclaimed REDD consoles, RS56 Passive EQ (‘the Curve Bender’) and J37 Tape, as well as the vintage King’s Microphones and the pioneering Reel ADT.

Find out more here.
Share with your friends on:

Visit Abbey Road's legendary Studio Two

13-10-2015
Visit Abbey Road's legendary Studio Two
We are pleased to announce ‘The Sound of Abbey Road Studios’, unique talks taking place in April and May 2014 featuring special guest former Abbey Road Studios Engineer Ken Scott.

The talks mark a new opportunity to visit Abbey Road Studios’ world famous Studio Two, where many iconic artists have recorded including The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kate Bush, Elton John, Oasis and Adele.

Event hosts Brian Kehew and Kevin Ryan, authors of critically acclaimed book Recording the Beatles, return for the third instalment of this fascinating talks series with a brand new lecture exploring the evolution of recording techniques and equipment, many of which were pioneered at Abbey Road Studios. In addition to the informative and entertaining stories behind these techniques, the lectures will include demonstrations using both new and vintage equipment, some of which has been used on many landmark recordings over the studios’ 82 year history.

For the first time in the series, Brian and Kevin welcome a special guest. Renowned former Abbey Road engineer Ken Scott will be returning to speak in the very room where he recorded tracks by legendary artists including Pink Floyd, Jeff Beck and the Beatles. An esteemed producer and pivotal figure in Abbey Road Studios’ history, Ken has also made records with The Rolling Stones, David Bowie and Lou Reed, to name but a few.

With Brian and Kevin’s incredible knowledge of Abbey Road Studios’ history and its role in the development of audio production plus Ken’s unique insight into life at the world’s first purpose built recording studios, these talks promise to be a captivating experience for all classical, rock, pop and film score fans.

Early entrance time will allow you to explore and take photographs in the famous Studio Two.

Please note, these events take place in Studio Two only and do not involve a tour.

‘The Sound of Abbey Road Studios’ events schedule:

Friday 25th April 2014
Session 1: Doors 2pm/ event starts 3pm
Session 2: Doors 7pm/ event starts 8pm

Saturday 26th April 2014
Session 1: Doors 10am/ event starts 11am
Session 2: Doors 3pm/ event starts 4pm

Sunday 27th April 2014
Session 1: Doors 10am/ event starts 11am
Session 2: Doors 3pm/ event starts 4pm

Friday 2nd May 2014
Session 1: Doors 2pm/ event starts 3pm
Session 2: Doors 7pm/ event starts 8pm

Saturday 3rd May 2014
Session 1: Doors 10am/ event starts 11am
Session 2: Doors 3pm/ event starts 4pm

Sunday 4th May 2014
Session 1: Doors 10am/ event starts 11am
Session 2: Doors 3pm/ event starts 4pm

 
Share with your friends on:

The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug tops box office

13-10-2015
The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug tops box office
The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug is currently topping the box office in both the US and the UK.

Howard Shore's score was recorded by Abbey Road's Director of Engineering Peter Cobbin on location in New Zealand, with additional recording by Lewis Jones, and mixed by Peter Cobbin and Kirsty Whalley. The soundtrack album was mastered by Simon Gibson at Abbey Road Studios.

Check out the trailer below.
Share with your friends on:

2013 Round-up: Mastering

13-10-2015
2013 Round-up: Mastering
It's been a great year for mastering at the studios. Here’s a brief overview of just some of the mastering and re-mastering projects our engineers have worked on:

Alex Wharton mastered MBV, My Bloody Valentine's first album of new material for over 20 years, which was released in February. He is also proud to have worked on the Beatles' On Air: Live at the BBC album.

Christian Wright's projects included Gabrielle Aplin's album English Rain, which charted at no.2 in the UK. He also mastered the debut album from The Temperance Movement, which charted at no.12, plus The Vamps' no.2 single Can We Dance.

Geoff Pesche mastered M.I.A's hugely anticipated 4th album Matangi, which was released to critical acclaim and featured in 'Best albums of 2013' articles by both NME and Pitchfork. Another key project for Geoff was Rizzle Kicks' album, Roaring 20s, which charted at no.3 in the UK.

Sean Magee worked on remasters for The Beatles and Rufus Wainwright, along with undertaking the massive Virgin 40 remastering project, celebrating 40 years of Virgin artists.

Frank Arkwright mastered Johnny Marr's long-awaited debut solo album, The Messenger, plus New Order's album Lost Sirens. He also mastered Mogwai albums Rave Tapes and Les Revenants, along with 65daysofstatic's Wild Light.

Miles Showell mastered Sophie Ellis-Bextor's Wanderlust, which entered the UK album chart at no.4, plus the new album from Magic Numbers. He also mastered the Ed Sheeran track I See Fire from the soundtrack to The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug, which hit the New Zealand singles chart at no.2 and the UK chart at no.13.

 
Share with your friends on:

Score to Philomena recorded at Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
Score to Philomena recorded at Abbey Road Studios
Starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan, critically acclaimed British drama Philomena opened in UK cinemas on Friday.

Alexandre Desplat’s score to the film was recorded in Studio One and Studio Two, and mixed in the Penthouse by Abbey Road Studios’ Director of Engineering, Peter Cobbin. Lewis Jones was Recordist for the sessions, with score editing by Kirsty Whalley.

Philomena was directed by Stephen Frears and produced by Tracey Seaward.

Check out the trailer here:
Share with your friends on:

Elton John and Gary Barlow record duet in Studio Two

13-10-2015
Elton John and Gary Barlow record duet in Studio Two
Gary Barlow and Elton John recorded and shot the video for their duet, Face to Face, in Studio Two. Keep an eye out for a guest appearance from a certain furry member of the Barlow family, around the 47 second mark!

Watch the video below.
Share with your friends on:

I See Fire mixed and mastered by Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
I See Fire mixed and mastered by Abbey Road Studios
Ed Sheeran’s I See Fire, from the soundtrack of Peter Jackson’s upcoming film The Hobbit: the Desolation of Smaug, was mixed by Abbey Road’s Director of Engineering Peter Cobbin and Kirsty Whalley.

Peter took time out to mix the track with Kirsty while mixing Howard Shore’s score to the film on location in New Zealand.

The track was mastered at Abbey Road Studios by Miles Showell.

Peter Jackson said of I See Fire, “Ed watched the movie at Park Road Post, immediately went into a room, and started writing and singing. Much of what you will hear on this song was recorded that same day, with a few overdubs and tweaks the following day. It was a great experience, and what you will see in this video are moments captured by our behind the scenes team during the creation of the song.”

Check out the video below.
Share with your friends on:

YouTube Music Awards: UK event at Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
YouTube Music Awards: UK event at Abbey Road Studios
The first ever YouTube Music Awards take place this week, and we’re excited to announce that we’re taking part.

Directed by music-video visionary Spike Jonze and featuring performances from Eminem, Arcade Fire and Lady Gaga, the awards will be simulcast live from New York this Sunday, 3rd November.

An hour long pre-event show will take place at Abbey Road Studios, hosted by Adam Buxton and featuring performances from Dizzee Rascal and Tinie Tempah. You’ll be able to tune in to watch from 9pm GMT/1pm PST/4pm ET.

Head over to youtube.com/musicawards to check out the nominations and cast your vote.
Share with your friends on:

New mastering suite at Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
New mastering suite at Abbey Road Studios
We are pleased to announce the expansion of our mastering department with investment in a new mastering suite and the addition of Miles Showell to our roster of engineers.

Our in-house team collaborated with acoustician Nick Whittaker and Miloco Builds on the design and build of the room, which includes a substantial reconstruction of the floated space to improve isolation and acoustic treatments throughout.

The new suite is equipped with an extensive range of top-of-the-range hardware and software mastering tools, which reflect our commitment to providing the very best equipment and facilities for clients. This includes a highly-coveted custom-made Shadow Hills Mastering Compressor, housed in a range of Sterling Modular studio furniture.

The new suite will be home to engineers Frank Arkwright and new addition Miles Showell.

Miles has been mastering for almost 30 years and joins Abbey Road Studios from Metropolis Mastering, where he became renowned for striving to improve the vinyl format by re-introducing half-speed mastering. Miles will now offer this service using Abbey Road’s vinyl lathes. Artists recently mastered by Miles include Jessie J, Disclosure, Eric Clapton, Faithless, The Who, Lana Del Rey, Cee Lo Green, Ed Harcourt and Underworld.

Frank Arkwright, with over 20 years’ experience, has previously worked at Metropolis and the Townhouse. He has a wealth of mastering and vinyl cutting knowledge, having worked with some of the world's greatest bands, including Arcade Fire, Blur, The Smiths, Snow Patrol, New Order, Biffy Clyro, Coldplay, Oasis and Primal Scream.

In addition to attended mastering sessions in Room 30, both Frank and Miles, along with the studios’ full mastering engineer roster, can now be booked for online projects via the new 'named engineer' feature on Abbey Road’s online mastering website.

Speaking of the new mastering suite and its inhabitants, Lucy Launder, Head of Mastering & Post Production at Abbey Road Studios said, “We’re delighted to be expanding our facilities, team and services. We look forward to working on projects of all sizes in this fantastic new room.”

New Mastering Suite Tech Spec:
Outboard
• Shadow Hills Mastering Compressor Special Edition
• Manley Massive Passive EQ
• Prism Maselec MEA2 EQ
• WAVES L2
• Avalon VT747
• Maselec De-esser
• Avalon 737s
• GML8200

Other hardware
• 2 x SADiE 6 systems with a wide range of plug-ins
• Abbey Road Moscow CRM AES router + monitor control
• Benchmark AD & DAs
• Optional Prism AD
• Pro Tools playback system
• Ampex ATR 102
• Audio Design ProBox room clocks
• B&W N801 / Bryston monitors
• PMC AML2 monitors
• EMI TG modules available on request
Share with your friends on:

Introducing the J37 Tape Saturation Plugin

13-10-2015
Introducing the J37 Tape Saturation Plugin
We are pleased to announce the J37 tape saturation plugin, a precision model of the very machine used to record many of the greatest masterpieces in modern music, created in conjunction with Waves Audio.

With a variety of user-adjustable controls including Tape Speed, Bias, Noise, Saturation, Wow and Flutter, the Waves: Abbey Road J37 faithfully recreates the inimitable sonic signature of the original machine. In addition to the J37 itself, three exclusive oxide tape formulas have been modelled. Specially developed by EMI during the ‘60s and ‘70s, each formula has its own unique frequency response and harmonic distortion behaviour. A comprehensive Tape Delay unit has been added, to complement those warm tones.

The Waves: Abbey Road J37 tape emulation plugin will bring stunning analogue warmth to your digital recordings, delivering a level of hardware realism never before experienced 'in the box'.

Buy your copy here.
Share with your friends on:

One Direction: This is Us at Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
One Direction: This is Us at Abbey Road Studios
Songs featured in upcoming documentary One Direction: This is Us, were recorded on location by Abbey Road's Live Here Now team and mixed at Abbey Road Studios by Sam Okell.

The audio was recorded over the course of four concerts at the O2 Arena in April 2013 by Live Here Now's David Loudoun, assisted by Joe Adams, Helen Broadhurst and Robin Delwiche. The team used DMZ Live’s new mobile facility, specially equipped with a Lawo MC56 desk, with microphone positioning at the venue optimised for the 3D nature of the film.

Working with the audio from the concert, Sam mixed twelve songs for the film in 5.1 surround sound, assisted by Toby Hulbert.

The sessions took place over two weeks in Abbey Road's Penthouse Studio, with the film’s director Morgan Spurlock in attendance to approve the final mix.


 
Share with your friends on:

The Beatles - On Air - Live at the BBC Volume 2

13-10-2015
The Beatles - On Air - Live at the BBC Volume 2
In 1994, The Beatles' Live at the BBC was released to worldwide acclaim - hitting number one in the U.K., number three in the U.S. and selling more than five million copies within six weeks.

A new companion to The Beatles' first BBC collection, On Air - Live at the BBC Volume 2, has been mastered at Abbey Road Studios by Alex Wharton and Guy Massey, and will be released on Monday 11th November. Pre-order your copy here.
Share with your friends on:

You can now choose your own mastering engineer

13-10-2015
You can now choose your own mastering engineer
We're excited to announce that you can now choose which engineer you'd like to work with via our online mastering service, for £110 per track. Having trouble deciding? Browse our engineers' discographies to get a feel for their recent work.

Or if you're in a bit of a hurry, you can opt for the next available engineer to master your music for £90 per track.

For more information and to get started with your next online booking, click here.
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios and Waves Audio present RS56

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios and Waves Audio present RS56
A passive equaliser with powerful sound-shaping capabilities, the RS56 Universal Tone Control was originally introduced in the early 1950s and used in Abbey Road Studios to prepare recordings for the record-lathe, as part of the process we now know as mastering. Later, Abbey Road’s pop engineers began using the RS56 for studio recordings because of its abilities to dramatically manipulate sound – unlike the basic treble and bass EQs found on the mixing consoles of the time. This earned it the nickname 'The Curve Bender'.

Waves and Abbey Road Studios have faithfully recreated the unique magic of the RS56, using advanced circuit modeling techniques based on the original schematics. Like its hardware predecessor, the Waves: Abbey Road RS56 passive EQ plugin features three bands with four selectable centre frequencies for each and six different filter types, plus independent or linked control over the left and right channels. The result is an extraordinary equaliser that is as effective today as it was when it was created over half a century ago.
Share with your friends on:

Stephen Lawrence concert line-up announced

13-10-2015
Stephen Lawrence concert line-up announced
On 18th June, some of the biggest names in music announced that they are joining forces to stage 'Unity – A Concert for Stephen Lawrence' at the O2 Arena this autumn, in aid of the Stephen Lawrence Trust.

Speakers at the launch event in Abbey Road's Studio One included Stephen’s mother, Doreen Lawrence, as well as Emeli Sandé and Rizzle Kicks, who are due to perform at the concert. The Rizzles were Abbey Road regulars this month, as they also attended mastering sessions for their upcoming album 'Roaring Twenties' with Geoff Pesche.

Other artists on the gig's line-up include Labrinth, Plan B, Jamie Cullum, Jessie J, Tinie Tempah, Rudimental, Ed Sheeran and Soul II Soul.

Doreen said: "This event sees UK artists and the music industry working together to create a one-off concert and raise awareness and money for the Stephen Lawrence Trust, further providing opportunities for those disadvantaged by their colour, their postcode, their ethnicity or their poverty – across the UK."
Share with your friends on:

Record Store Day 2013 at Abbey Road Studios

13-10-2015
Record Store Day 2013 at Abbey Road Studios
Record Store Day 2013 takes place tomorrow, Saturday 20th April, with many of the records set for release cut at Abbey Road Studios.

Celebrating vinyl and independent record stores, limited edition exclusive records from some of the world’s top artists will be made available to buy in stores for one day only.

Abbey Road’s Geoff Pesche, Adam Nunn, Steve Rooke, Sean Magee and Frank Arkwright have worked on special releases from Pink Floyd, Marillion, UFO, Hawkwind, Duran Duran, Human League, Sex Pistols, Beta Band, Bowie, The Verve, Biffy Clyro, Jethro Tull and Simple Minds.

Check out the full list of available releases on the Record Store Day website, and be sure to get to your local record shop nice and early to pick up the most sought-after items. Good luck!
Share with your friends on:

Baseball biopic 42 hits it out of the park

13-10-2015
Baseball biopic 42 hits it out of the park
Baseball biopic 42 has scored a Box Office home run, shooting straight to the top of the US chart on its opening weekend.

Mark Isham’s score was recorded in Studio One by Abbey Road’s Director of Engineering, Peter Cobbin. Recordist Lewis Jones also worked on the sessions, assisted by Jamie Ashton.

The film is based upon the incredible life story of Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play Major League Baseball.

"The major inspiration for the score was Jackie [Robinson] himself,” said Isham. “He was a unique character in history who did a very unique and wonderful thing for the betterment of American society. The more you see him onscreen and you read about him and you know about him, he himself is really all the inspiration I needed to write the score. Recording at Abbey Road was equally inspiring. The great tradition, with its history, superb quality and excellent staff, all contribute to getting a world class product!"
Share with your friends on:

Score to Danny Boyle's Trance recorded at Abbey Road

13-10-2015
Score to Danny Boyle's Trance recorded at Abbey Road
Following the spectacular Olympic opening ceremony, Academy Award-winning director Danny Boyle has once again teamed up with Rick Smith from Underworld and Abbey Road Studios, this time to record the score to his art heist thriller ‘Trance’.

Smith’s score was recorded in Studios One and Two by Abbey Road Studios’ Director of Engineering, Peter Cobbin, and mixed by Cobbin and Kirsty Whalley.

"Working with Danny is a joy, because he's both a great collaborator and a giver of artistic freedom" said Smith. "He wants his film music loud and with presence, almost like another character."

As part of the soundtrack, the film also features a brand new song from double Brit Award-winner Emeli Sandé. ‘Here It Comes’, co-written and performed by Sandé, was recorded by Cobbin in Studio Two and mixed by Cobbin and Whalley.
Share with your friends on:

Suede to perform in Studio Three for Absolute Radio

13-10-2015
Suede to perform in Studio Three for Absolute Radio
Suede will be playing their first ever session at Abbey Road Studios on 18th April, and you could be there. Click here to enter our competition to win one of two pairs of guestlist places.

Tune into Absolute Radio on the day to listen to the session live.

Suede's new album Bloodsports, cut to vinyl by Christian Wright, is out now - purchase your copy here.

 
Share with your friends on:

Avid and Abbey Road Studios launch song competition

13-10-2015
Avid and Abbey Road Studios launch song competition
We have teamed up with Avid, the makers of the industry-leading audio production and recording system Pro Tools®, to launch a song contest to uncover hidden musical talent.

The contest gives aspiring artists, musicians and producers across the globe the chance for their work to be judged by an illustrious panel of music industry figures, as well as fans online, during the voting period from March 14 – March 21, 2013. The three winning artists, chosen by judges, will receive the ultimate package which includes a track of their choice being mixed and mastered online by Abbey Road Studios as well as an Avid Pro Tools|HD Native system.

“The hardest thing for an aspiring musician is to get their songs heard by the right people,” said Greg Wells, competition judge and multiple Grammy-nominated producer, mixer and songwriter. “This competition is the perfect way for artists to get their music out there and I’m really looking forward to listening to an eclectic mix of songs.”

Artists can upload their original song to 'Submit a Track' from today until March 13, 2013, with the winners of the Judges choice, Fans choice and Judges choice runner-up being announced on April 10, 2013. Voting for the Fans choice award runs from March 14 – March 21, 2013.  

Judges' Choice Award
  •     The judging panel will be made up of industry professionals including multiple Grammy-winning producer, mixer and songwriter Greg Wells (Adele, Katy Perry); musician, producer and A&R representative John Feldmann (Goldfinger, Good Charlotte); and Grammy-winning producer Tricky Stewart (Beyoncé, Mariah Carey, Rihanna). They will choose their three favorite songs, with the winning entrants getting an original song mixed and mastered by Abbey Road’s Online Mixing & Mastering Services as well as a full Pro Tools|HD Native recording system from Avid.

 Fans' Choice Award
  •     Fans around the world can also vote for their favorite song, with the winning entrant receiving an Avid Mbox® audio interface with Pro Tools 10 software.

“Avid and Abbey Road Studios have a shared passion for the creation of music, so we’re delighted to be teaming up to give aspiring musicians the chance to showcase their original work to three of the music industry’s most respected figures, as well as providing a platform for their work to reach a global audience,” said W. Sean Ford, Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, Avid. “The industry-standard technology in Pro Tools is designed to enhance the creative process, and through new more accessible offerings such as Abbey Road’s Online Mixing and Mastering Services, it’s becoming easier for aspiring musicians to benefit from this technology and add a professional finish to their work.”
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios’ Awards Success

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios’ Awards Success
With awards season well underway, we are delighted to have so many Abbey Road projects honoured at the Golden Globes and nominated for the Grammys, BAFTAs, Oscars and CAS awards.

The 70th Golden Globe Awards took place on 13th January. Abbey Road projects scored a hat-trick of accolades:
  • Adele’s Skyfall theme, recorded in Studio Two, won Best Original Song – Motion Picture. Watch her acceptance speech here.
  • Les Misérables, recorded and mixed by Abbey Road’s Jonathan Allen and mastered for CD by Simon Gibson, won Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical
  • Brave, recorded and mixed by Abbey Road’s Andrew Dudman and mastered for CD by Andy Walter, won Best Animated Feature Film

Many of our projects have also been shortlisted for the 55th Annual Grammy Awards, with winners to be revealed at the ceremony taking place on 10th February:
  • Ed Sheeran’s The A Team, mastered by Christian Wright, is nominated for Song of the Year
  • Florence + the Machine are nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album for Ceremonials, recorded in Studio Three. They are also up for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for Shake it Out, taken from the same album.
  • Maroon 5, Overexposed are also nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album. Chris Bolster recorded a track for the deluxe edition of the album in Studio Two.
  • In the Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album category, Paul McCartney is nominated for Kisses on the Bottom. Strings, guitar and piano were recorded in Studio Two by Sam Okell, assisted by Gordon Davidson.
  • Up for Best Latin Pop Album is ¿Con Quién Se Queda El Perro?, mastered by Geoff Pesche
  • In the Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media category we received two nominations: The Artist composed by Ludovic Bource and mastered by Peter Mew, and Hugo, composed by Howard Shore and recorded and mixed by Simon Rhodes, assisted by Gordon Davidson.
  • Paul McCartney’s Ram is up for Best Historical Album. The project was engineered by Steve Rooke, Simon Gibson and Guy Massey, who are all personally nominated for a Grammy for their contribution.

We have also had several projects nominated for a BAFTA, with winners to be announced on 10th February:
  • Zero Dark Thirty, mixed by Sam Okell, and Les Misérables are both up for Best Film
  • In the Outstanding British Film category, every one of the nominees was recorded, mixed or mastered at Abbey Road. These were The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, recorded and mixed by Simon Rhodes in Studio One, Seven Psychopaths, recorded in Studio Two, Skyfall, recorded by Simon Rhodes in Studio One with Lewis Jones as Recordist, Anna Karenina, mastered by Andrew Walter, and Les Misérables.
  • Brave and Paranorman are both shortlisted in the Animated Film category.
  • Thomas Newman’s Skyfall score and Dario Marianelli’s music for Anna Karenina are both nominated for Original Music.
  • In the Sound category, Abbey Road’s Jonathan Allen is personally nominated for a BAFTA for his work on Les Misérables

This year, many of our engineers have also been shortlisted for the prestigious CAS Awards for outstanding achievement in sound mixing. The winners will be announced on 16th February.
  • Four Abbey Road Studios engineers are nominated in the Motion Pictures – Live Action category: Peter Cobbin for The Hobbit: an Unexpected Journey, Jonathan Allen for Les Misérables, Simon Rhodes for Skyfall and Sam Okell for Zero Dark Thirty.
  • In the Motion Pictures – Animated category Andrew Dudman is nominated twice, for his work on both Brave and Rise of the Guardians.

Last but by no means least, many Abbey Road Studios projects are in the running at the Oscars, with winners due to be unveiled on Sunday 24th February.
  • Les Misérables and Zero Dark Thirty are up for Best Picture
  • ParaNorman, recorded in Studio One with Chris Bolster as Recordist, The Pirates! Band of Misfits, recorded in Studio One with Lewis Jones as Recordist, and Brave are nominated in the Animated Feature Film category
  • Thomas Newman’s score for Skyfall and Dario Marianelli’s for Anna Karenina are up for Music – Original Score.
  • Adele’s eponymous theme from Skyfall is up for Music – Original Song, along with Suddenly from Les Misérables, which was recorded at Air and mixed at Abbey Road by Jonathan Allen and mastered by Simon Gibson.

This is an incredible array of awards; well done to everyone who worked on these projects. It caps off a fantastic 2012. Good luck to those who have been nominated personally! We have our fingers crossed for you.
Share with your friends on:

New partnership with Panasonic Automotive Systems

13-10-2015
New partnership with Panasonic Automotive Systems
Building upon a history of providing the industry’s top in-vehicle entertainment systems, Panasonic Automotive Systems Company of America has formed a working agreement with Abbey Road Studios to develop custom audio systems for the automotive market.

The exclusive agreement provides the framework for the two leaders in their respective industries to work together to create customized products for the global automotive market.

As more and more vehicles are equipped with increasingly advanced systems for in-vehicle entertainment, Panasonic Automotive and Abbey Road Studios will work together to develop audio solutions that provide superior technology as well as emotional connections with consumers.

Speaking of the agreement, Jonathan Smith, Senior Vice President, Abbey Road Studios said, “We are delighted to be working with such a strong partner that has a shared passion for the very best in audio. We look forward to developing an exciting range of products, which will bring some of the Abbey Road magic to music lovers’ vehicles.”
Share with your friends on:

Inside Abbey Road: the Best Studio in the World

13-10-2015
Inside Abbey Road: the Best Studio in the World
We are pleased to announce 'Inside Abbey Road: the Best Studio in the World' - a new series of talks to be held in the famous Studio Two during March 2013.

Brian Kehew and Kevin Ryan (authors of the critically acclaimed, definitive book ‘Recording the Beatles’), will give their second series of fascinating and enjoyable talks on Abbey Road Studios’ rich history and continued success at the forefront of today’s music. The talks will feature brand new content alongside the most popular elements of the last series.

Kehew and Ryan’s talk will explore the studios’ decades of landmark recordings, celebrating the technology and sonic creativity that lead to epoch-defining music from fêted artists such as Radiohead, Pink Floyd, Adele and of course, The Beatles.

With over 20 years of research into EMI history, they have uncovered many secrets of the Studios and have worked with us to preserve and illuminate our immense history and ongoing legacy. The talks will explore the history and the present day action at Abbey Road Studios with rare archive photos, film and audio, showing changes to the studio and equipment. They will illustrate Abbey Road Studios’ long progression through all kinds of music, from classical to rock and beyond, plus the methods used to record in each style/period.

These events will also give more focus to the more recent hits recorded, mixed and mastered at the studios, and artists who currently use the studios to create new and innovative music. They will also explore the studios’ rich experience in film scoring and even demonstrate how sound and images are synched for some of the biggest movies ever made such as ‘Star Wars’, ‘Harry Potter’, ‘Lord of the Rings’ ‘The King's Speech’, ‘Prometheus’ and the new Bond film ‘Skyfall,’

If all that wasn’t enough, Brian and Kevin will bring the authentic, classic sound of the past to life with demonstration of a vintage 4 track mixing console and tape machine, as well as the studios’ legendary echo chamber - used on countless classic recordings. The popular display of original instruments, microphones, and studio hardware used to create classic tracks at Abbey Road will be making a welcome return.

Visitors will be allowed early entrance with time to explore and take photographs in the famous Studio Two, where seminal acts like The Beatles, Oasis, The Hollies, The Shadows, Pink Floyd and Kate Bush recorded epoch-defining music. More recently, Elbow recorded their theme for the 2012 Olympics in this legendary studio and artists such as Brian Wilson, Paul Simon, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Ryan Adams, Laura Marling and Feist laid down performances for the ‘Live From Abbey Road’ television show.

Tickets, priced £80, are on sale now from See Tickets.

‘Inside Abbey Road’ events schedule:

Friday 8th March
Session 1: doors open 2pm / event starts 3pm
Session 2: doors open 7pm / event starts 8pm

Saturday 9th March
Session 1: doors open 10am / event starts 11am
Session 2: doors open 3pm / event starts 4pm

Sunday 10th March
Session 1: doors open 10am / event starts 11am
Session 2: doors open 3pm / event starts 4pm

Friday 15th March
Session 1: doors open 2pm / event starts 3pm
Session 2: doors open 7pm / event starts 8pm

Saturday 16th March
Session 1: doors open 10am / event starts 11am
Session 2: doors open 3pm / event starts 4pm

Sunday 17th March
Session 1: doors open 10am / event starts 11am
Session 2: doors open 3pm / event starts 4pm

Please note, these events do not include a tour of Abbey Road Studios.

 
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Meets... Ken Townsend

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Meets... Ken Townsend
Today marks the 51st anniversary of The Beatles’ first ever recording session at Abbey Road Studios, which took place on 6th June 1962.

In honour of the occasion we put your questions to Ken Townsend, who was an engineer on that very session and went on to manage Abbey Road Studios for over 20 years.

We were inundated with questions on Facebook and Twitter, and it was a tough call picking the best ones to put to Ken. Thank you to everyone who participated!

Here’s the interview in full:

What kind of engineer are you? - ‏@manyreasonsy, via Twitter

A long since retired one, now an octogenarian and currently building a wall and steps in the garden!

I was trained as a design and development engineer at EMI in Hayes, but moved to Abbey Road in my final year as a trainee, in 1954. My job title was then Recording Engineer, but what are now known as Recording Engineers were then called Balance Engineers.

What was your first session like? - ‏@chrisdmccullo, via Twitter

The first session I worked on was in Studio One with Peter Dawson, a very famous Australian Bass Baritone. When introduced to him as our latest recruit by Harold Davison, he shook me warmly by the hand and wished me a long and successful career.

What was your first impression of the Beatles? - ‏@manyreasonsy, via Twitter

Simple amazement, because I had never seen anything like them before.

Did the band seem to take to the studio quickly or were they very obviously "green?" – Josh Katz, via Facebook

Like a duck to water. They had auditions at Decca and elsewhere and been totally rejected, so it was not their very first time in a professional studio.

Which Beatle was the most nervous and which was the least? The studio can be intimidating the first couple of goes round! - Matthew Loman, via Facebook

They showed no external signs of nerves, in fact the opposite. Their sense of humour was similar to mine - constantly wise cracking.

They looked just like four peas in a pod and I could not tell one from the other for some while, except for Ringo when he took over from Pete Best on the 4th September session.

Which song sounded best on that session? - ‏@manyreasonsy, via Twitter

In hindsight, it was a toss-up between Love Me Do and Ask Me Why (as you have done). What fascinated me was that none of the lyrics seemed to include words of more than four letters.

Did you have any problems when recording [the first Beatles] session? - @VramaW, via Twitter

After running through the songs, it was obvious we were getting distortion from the bass guitar. Norman Smith tried the usual remedy of reducing the level in the studio and cranking it up on the mixer, but to no avail. George Martin said if we could not find a solution, then he might have to abandon the session.

We were strictly forbidden from tampering with artist’s guitar amps due to reports of electrocution of performers on stage, and the studio had no such equipment. I suggested a possible alternative of getting the large Tannoy speaker from Echo Chamber One and driving it with a Leak TL12 power Amp I had upstairs, which I was taking to Rome later that month for an operatic recording.

So while Tape Op Chris Neal and George Martin went to the canteen for a cuppa with the lads, Norman and myself carried this speaker to the studio and I then wired a jack socket onto the input of the leak pre-amp. By some miracle it worked, but I often reflect on what might have happened without this brainwave.

Did you ever feel at that time that the band would go on to become what they are now? - Nishant Shukul, via Facebook

Nobody in the whole wide world could have forecast what was to follow, as it had never happened before. Some artists such as Johnny Ray had received huge adulation from their fans, but the Beatles’ rise to fame across the globe was meteoric and unprecedented. I doubt it will ever be repeated.

Did the session feel magical at the time or only in hindsight? - @Notebookscrawla, via Twitter

Immediately after the session, I could not stop talking about them to my family and friends. This was most unusual, as we were working at Abbey Road with the greatest recording artists in the world on a daily basis and rarely mentioned them unless asked. I was to a degree infatuated by them.

In terms of attitude and work ethic in the studio, how did the Beatles differ from other acts you worked with? - Liam Carlton-Jones, via Facebook

Most artists at that time had a fantastic attitude to work, but their recording schedules were consistent with Musician Union rules of 2 or 3 hour sessions with possibly half an hour’s overtime. The Beatles, once firmly established, had no fixed finishing time so we often worked until the early hours of the morning.

When Paul introduced me to Nancy [Shevell], she remarked I must have many funny stories to tell. “Not really…they worked hard all the time,” I replied. “Do you know that from Sept 4th 1962 until their last session at Abbey Road on 4th Jan 1970, they wrote, recorded and released 212 songs? That equates to one every 13 and a half days for over seven years, and that time includes tours, holidays and everything else.” “Geraway!” said Paul. So yes, their work ethic was outstanding but by no means unique.

What was your greatest experience with The Beatles? - @IsayMcBell, via Twitter

The first time they came into Studio Two in 1968 after I had been promoted to Manager of Technical Operations, they obviously were made aware of this fact. I received a phone call in my office from their Road Manager, Mal Evans, saying the Beatles had a very serious complaint so would I come to Studio Two immediately please.

Feeling rather scared I went to the Control Room, where all four were stood behind the mixing console. Spokesman John Lennon, clutching a roll of EMI toilet paper, said “Mr Townsend, we have a very serious complaint: the toilet paper in this place is too hard and shiny and you can’t wipe your bum on it. Not only that, it has EMI Limited stamped on every sheet. If you do not do something about it we will notify the Chairman.”

At the time I did not realise it was possibly a wind up, but we changed all the paper from that day on, so they did us a big favour.

Were there any engineering processes that you had never done before, that you used for creative input on The Beatles? - @NateWhittaker, via Twitter

Yes. There are too many to list in detail, but many related to ingenious ways we utilized the brilliant Studer four track machine when we really needed many more tracks. These included ‘four to fours’, track bouncing, dropping in, locking two machines together in sync and frequent use of frequency control.

The Amp Room [a nickname for Abbey Road’s technical engineers], of which I was a member, have never received the recognition they deserve for their contribution to the Beatles recordings, as no session could ever have taken place without their presence.

You are reported as the one who found Automatic Double-Tracking technique during Revolver album recording. How did that come about? - Brenda Gracia, via Facebook

One night we had been double tracking Paul’s voice by sending a track down to the studio via cans [headphones] and him singing over his own voice. It was a time consuming process, and a waste of a valuable track on the tape machine.

Driving home in the early hours of the morning, I came up with an idea how this could be done by sending the sync output of a Studer J37 and delaying this by using a BTR2 with the capstan motor on frequency control, then adding it to the original signal from the replay output of the Studer.

I rushed back to work the following morning, tried my idea out and it worked. I demonstrated it to the Beatles the following evening and they utilized it frequently from then on. About six months later I was called up to the General Manager’s office, and told not to use it until it had been technically approved. The same evening the Beatles used it again!

Ken, you developed ADT for the Beatles. Were there any other doublers being used in studios at that time? - @ParsonWickertoe, via Twitter

To my knowledge, there was nothing available. Digital Delay Lines could have done a similar sort of job, but they were not of sufficient quality at that time, being only 12bit. They would not have been able to do the secondary use of ADT which was for phasing.

How did you set up the recording sessions? – Dave Gibbs, via Facebook

There was a basic set up for different types of recording, but each engineer had their own ideas of choice of microphones etc. Some recordings took ages to get ready, especially when we had separate set ups for mono and stereo.

Which records particularly inspired you as a kid, and did any of them influence your work as an engineer? - Myles Eastwood, via Facebook

I was a kid in World War II. The only records we heard then were by Vera Lynn!

If you could turn back the time, which recording session(s) you would like to go back to? ‏- @Brenda_Gracia, via Twitter

I loved location recordings. Beyond The Fringe at the Cambridge Arts Theatre and Adge Cutler and the Wurzels, live in Somerset would top my list.

Lots of people think that the fxs like ADT have been replaced with protools plugins, is that true or is real ADT still in use today? - ‏@MGORKI, via Twitter

Yes, the original ADT is no longer in use. Some artists have told me the modern devices don’t sound as good, but time moves on.

Did you find tape hiss a major problem (pre-Dolby) and what tape speeds were most commonly used? - @techygeezer, via Twitter

Tape hiss was never a major problem, as we lined up our tape machines to the optimum specification. Tape hiss became noticeable on second generation tapes. We used 15ips for pop and occasionally 30ips on classical.

We had a compansion noise reduction system designed by EMI Research well before Dolby, but it never really caught on or was deemed necessary.

What do you think of music recorded now? As back then everything had soul. - Patrick Tobin, via Facebook

I went to see Mark Knopfler at the Albert Hall last Friday. He and his musicians were absolutely fantastic, but some of the modern recordings leave me cold. I hate seeing artists performing ‘live’ on TV when they are obviously miming.

Studios have changed a hell of a lot over the years. What are some of the changes in regards to equipment that you've liked and perhaps not liked so much? - Ben Varcoe, via Facebook

I am not really qualified to comment anymore, but at Abbey Road their equipment utilizes a mixture of the most modern and some of the old valve microhones and modules. That philosophy gets my wholehearted approval.

What is your fondest memory of working at Abbey Road, or what aspect of working there really kept you going through all those years? - Kevin Lynn Brown, via Facebook

My fondest memory of Abbey Road is all the dedicated staff who worked for me, and the support I got even when making difficult decisions.
Share with your friends on:

Fast & Furious 6 tops box office charts

13-10-2015
Fast & Furious 6 tops box office charts
Fast & Furious 6 raced straight to the top of the US and UK box office charts upon release.

The score was composed by Lucas Vidal, produced by Lorne Balfe, and recorded by Peter Cobbin in Studio One and Studio Two. Lewis Jones assisted on the sessions, with Matt Jones and Iain Berryman.

Check out the trailer here:
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios win at the British Inspiration Awards

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios win at the British Inspiration Awards
We are proud to announce that we won the Music category at the British Inspiration Awards, facing off stiff competition from BBC Radio 6 Music, Gary Barlow, Gareth Malone of the Military Wives Choir and Jools Holland. The awards, which took place on 16th May in London, recognise achievement in the creative industries.

“We’re delighted to have been given this prestigious award”, said our General Manager Jonathan Smith. “Abbey Road continues to thrive as a world-leading studio at the pinnacle of the recording industry, and it’s an honour to receive this award in recognition of all our hard work.”

You can check out the full list of winners on the British Inspiration Awards’ website.
Share with your friends on:

The Dark Side of the Moon 40th Anniversary

13-10-2015
The Dark Side of the Moon 40th Anniversary
Recorded in Abbey Road's Studio Three and originally released in March 1973, The Dark Side of The Moon celebrated its 40th anniversary this month. To mark the occasion, a 5.1 playback of the album was held in the very studio in which it was created, with Nick Mason in attendance.

The record became Pink Floyd's first number one album in the US, remaining on the chart for 741 weeks between 1973 and 1988. One of the best-selling and most critically acclaimed albums of all time, The Dark Side of The Moon also introduced the iconic cover artwork by Hipgnosis, after a request for a 'simple and bold' design.

The new Discovery version presents the original studio album, digitally remastered and reissued with newly designed Digipak and a new 12 page booklet designed by Storm Thorgerson, whose artwork is featured above.

You can download a special poster featuring Storm's Dark Side of the Moon artwork here.

Grab your special edition of the album here.
Share with your friends on:

The Croods top UK and US Box Office Charts

13-10-2015
The Croods top UK and US Box Office Charts
Dreamworks' latest animation, The Croods, shot to the top of the box office chart on both sides of the Atlantic upon release.

Composed by Alan Silvestri, the score was recorded in Studio One by external engineer Dennis Sands with Abbey Road recordist Lewis Jones, assisted by Matt Jones. Abbey Road's Director of Engineering, Peter Cobbin, carried out additional recording including all choral work.

The film was co-scripted by world-renowned funnyman John Cleese, and features the voices of Nicolas Cage, Ryan Reynolds and Emma Stone. Check out the trailer:
Share with your friends on:

Abbey Road Studios triumphs at the BAFTAs

13-10-2015
Abbey Road Studios triumphs at the BAFTAs
Congratulations to Abbey Road Studios engineer Jonathan Allen, who has been awarded a BAFTA for his work recording and mixing Les Misérables.

The film won Best Sound, with Jonathan in attendance to collect the accolade. Watch his acceptance speech here.

Other Abbey Road projects to triumph included Skyfall, which won in both the Outstanding British Film and Original Music categories. Thomas Newman’s score was recorded by Simon Rhodes in Studio One, with Lewis Jones as Recordist.

Brave, which was recorded and mixed by Abbey Road’s Andrew Dudman and mastered for CD by Andy Walter, won Best Animated Film.

Meanwhile at The Grammys, Paul McCartney picked up Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album for Kisses on the Bottom. Strings, guitar and piano for the album were recorded in Studio Two by Sam Okell, assisted by Gordon Davidson.

Finally, the Cinema Audio Society awards celebrating outstanding achievement in sound mixing took place at the weekend, with both Jonathan Allen and Andrew Dudman picking up gongs for their mixing on Les Misérables and Brave respectively.

Huge congratulations to all the winners from everyone at Abbey Road.

 
Share with your friends on:

12 hours to record Please Please Me

13-10-2015